Prolimatech Armageddon & Coolermaster V8 CPU Coolers

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Cooling Results

Prolimatech Armageddon w/ ref. 120 mm fan
Fan Voltage
SPL@1m
Temp
°C Rise
12V
16 dBA
62°C
40
9V
13 dBA
64°C
42
7V
12 dBA
68°C
46
Prolimatech Armageddon w/ Noctua 140 mm fan
8V
19 dBA
62°C
40
7V
15 dBA
64°C
42
6.5V
14 dBA
65°C
43
5V
12 dBA
70°C
48
Prolimatech Armageddon w/ Scythe 140 mm fan
10V
21 dBA
58°C
36
9V
17 dBA
60°C
38
8V
14 dBA
63°C
41
7V
11~12 dBA
65°C
43
Load Temp: Prime95 for ~10 mins.
°C Rise: Temperature rise above ambient (22°C) at load.

Though the Armageddon is design to be used with a 140 mm fan, it performed pretty well when paired with our reference 120 mm fan. The thermal rise was only 40°C at 12V, increasing to by a small amount as the fan speed was reduced. Surprisingly the larger Noctua fan lagged behind. The Nexus fan at 9V generated the same thermal result as the Noctua fan at 7V, but measured 2 dBA lower which is easily noticed at 13~15 dBA level. In addition, the lowest speeds we tested for both fans produced 12 dBA, yet the Nexus had a 2°C edge in cooling.

The Scythe 140 mm fan fared much better than the Noctua. Running at 9V and 17 dBA, it bested the NF-P14 running at 8V and 19 dBA by 2°C. At 7V, it generated less noise than both the Nexus and Noctua fans at their lowest tested speeds, but held a solid 3°C lead over the Nexus and absolutely dominated the Noctua by 5°C.

The Scythe's convincing victory over the Noctua makes a compelling argument for its use as our 140 mm reference fan. The model we used isn't available yet, but non-PWM versions are on the market and should perform similarly. They are also more affordable, selling for US$12~$14 while the Noctua goes for more than US$20.

Coolermaster V8 w/ stock 120 mm fan*
Fan Voltage
SPL@1m
Temp
°C Rise
12V
31 dBA
64°C
42
9V
22 dBA
66°C
44
8V
18~19 dBA
68°C
46
7V
14 dBA
71°C
49
6V
12 dBA
78°C
56
Coolermaster V8 w/ ref. 120 mm fan*
12V
16 dBA
68°C
46
9V
13 dBA
72°C
50
7V
12 dBA
76°C
54
Load Temp: Prime95 for ~10 mins.
°C Rise: Temperature rise above ambient (22°C) at load.
*top cover was removed during testing (did not affect thermal performance).

The Coolermaster V8 is nowhere near proficient as the Armageddon. When paired with the stock fan, it is only competitive when fan speeds are high. At 7V and 14 dBA, the thermal rise approached 50°C and increased by 7°C at 6V. Our reference fan was a much better performer; at 12V, it produced the same CPU temperature as the stock fan at 8V, but was also quieter by 2~3 dBA. The Nexus also topped the stock fan by 2°C at the 12 dBA level.

A low speed fan doesn't have much of a chance sandwiched in the middle of a structure like that of the V8's. The fin spacing is on the tight side and , the fins on the smaller heatsink sections on the outside run perpendicular to those on the inside. With so much impedance on both sides of the fan, it is exceedingly difficult to cool the V8 without high airflow.

Comparables

°C rise Comparison
Heatsink
Nexus 120mm fan voltage /
SPL @1m
12V
9V
7V
Rank
16 dBA
13 dBA
12 dBA
Prolimatech Megahalems
38
41
44
#1
Prolimatech Armageddon
(Scythe 140 mm fan)
38
17 dBA
41
14 dBA
43
12 dBA
N/A
Noctua NH-D14
38
42
45
#2
Noctua NH-U12P
39
42
44
#2
Scythe Mugen-2
39
42
45
#4
Cogage TRUE Spirit 1366
40
42
45
#4
Prolimatech Armageddon
40
42
46
#6
Zalman CNPS10X Quiet
40
43
46
#6
Thermalright U120 eXtreme
40
43
48
#8
Thermalright U120
42
45
49
#9
Noctua NH-C12P
43
47
51
#10
Zalman CNPS10X Extreme
43
47
53
#11
Zalman CNPS10X Flex
45
50
54
#12
Coolermaster V8
46
50
54
#12
Scythe Kabuto
51
53
60
#14

The Prolimatech Armageddon comes in a couple of degrees short of its older brother when paired with our reference 120 mm fan. It needs to be used with a decent 140 mm fan like the Scythe Slip Stream to really compete with Megahalems, but even then, it's a very close race. Of course we'd wager that equipping any of the heatsinks in our top 5 with the same Scythe 140 mm fan would give us similar results.

The Coolermaster V8 just doesn't have what it takes to excel as a quiet CPU heatsink. The convoluted mess of heatpipes and fins is too much for a low speed fan to overcome. Beset on both sides with heavy impedance, our reference fan delivered a disappointing result that places the V8 near the bottom of our chart.



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