Havik 140: NZXT's First CPU Heatsink

Cooling
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Stock Fan Measurements

Specifications: NZXT Havik 140 Stock Fan
Manufacturer
Power Rating
3.6 W
Model Number
?
Airflow Rating
90.3 CFM
Bearing Type
Sleeve
Speed Rating
1200 RPM ± 10%
Corners
Open
Noise Rating
25.2 dBA
Frame Size
140 x 140 x 26 mm
Header Type
3-pin
Fan Blade Diameter
129 mm
Starting Voltage
3.3 V
Hub Size
40 mm
Weight
150 g
Data in green cells provided by the manufacturer or observed; data in the blue cells were measured.

The fans included with the Havik 140 are sleeve bearing models with nine thin, twisted blades, and a short 15 cm 3-pin cable. A 15 cm Y cable is included to plug both fans into the same header, though we would probably recommend against powering it via a motherboard header if its 3.6W power rating is accurate. The struts holding the motor in place are curved but in a manner that makes them almost parallel with the trailing edges of the fan blades. To lessen the probability of turbulence and tonality, they should be curved in the opposite direction.

Stock Fan Measurements
Voltage
Avg. Speed
SPL@1m
One Fan
Two Fans
12V
1270 RPM
27~28 dBA
31 dBA
9V
1030 RPM
20~21 dBA
25 dBA
8V
940 RPM
18 dBA
22~23 dBA
7V
850 RPM
15 dBA
20 dBA
6V
750 RPM
13 dBA
16~17 dBA
5V
630 RPM
12 dBA
14 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from the center of the heatsink.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

The acoustics of the stock fan are excellent, similar to our reference Noctua NF-P14 fan. It is whiny at 12V and turbulent at 9V~10V but both these effects lessen as the fan speed is decreased. More importantly, it is smooth throughout most of its range, and becomes quiet at a relatively high level, 8V / 940 RPM.

The stock fans don't sound nearly as good in tandem however. When both are placed on the Havik 140, the noise signature acquires an odd pulsing type sound audible at 7V and above. This may be caused by intermodulation which is odd because the speeds of the two fan samples were very close, within 30~40 RPM of one another. The odd shape of the fins could also play a part in this.


With both stock fans installed and running at 7V, the Havik 140 measures 16~17 dBA@1m.

Cooling Results

Fan Voltage
One Fan
Two Fans
SPL@1m
Thermal Rise
Thermal Rise
SPL@1m
Stock 140mm Fan
12V
27~28 dBA
38°C
36°C
31 dBA
9V
20~21 dBA
41°C
38°C
25 dBA
8V
18 dBA
42°C
39°C
22~23 dBA
7V
15 dBA
42°C
39°C
20 dBA
6V
13 dBA
44°C
41°C
16~17 dBA
Reference 140mm Fan: Noctua NF-P14
12V
27 dBA
38°C
36°C
31 dBA
9V
19~20 dBA
40°C
38°C
23~24 dBA
8V
17 dBA
41°C
39°C
19~20 dBA
7V
14~15 dBA
43°C
40°C
16~17 dBA
6V
13 dBA
47°C
43°C
13~14 dBA

The Havik 140 was an excellent performer, maintaining a thermal rise above ambient of 36°C at 12V and suffering only a 5°C degradation at 5V. Its cooling ability was about 3°C worse using just a one fan. In a single fan configuration, our reference Noctua fan was slightly better at 8V~9V, but at the 6V/13 dBA level, the stock fan proved superior by 3°C. It's also notable that at 7V~12V, the measured noise level with one reference fan was 1~2 dB lower than normal, so the rubber isolators appear to work as advertised.

It seems that the odd acoustic effect we encountered when pairing up the stock fans resulted in higher measurable noise as well. Our reference fan produced noise levels very close to that of the stock fan, but when paired up, the SPL increase in the 7V~12V range was 2~4 dB compared to 4~5 dB for the stock fans. As a result two Noctuas were quieter at the same voltage levels, while generating similar temperatures.



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