Phanteks PH-TC14PE Dual Fan CPU Heatsink

Cooling
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STOCK FAN MEASUREMENTS

Specifications: Phanteks PH-TC14PE
Manufacturer
Power Rating
2.8 W
(2.16 W on label)
Model Number
PH-F140
(PH-F120 on label)
Airflow Rating
88.6 CFM
Bearing Type
UFB (Updraft Floating Balance)
Speed Rating
1300 ± 10% RPM
Corners
Open
Noise Rating
19.6 dB (A)
Frame Size
140 x 140 x 25 mm
Header Type
3-pin
Blade Diameter
132 mm
Starting Voltage
3.9 V
Hub Size
41 mm
Weight
170 g
Data in green cells provided by the manufacturer or observed; data in the blue cells were measured.

The stock fan's blades are straighter than most and fills up most of the space between the hub and the frame. The gaps between the blades and the space between the blade edges and frame is minimal. It's also notable that the tips of the blades are raised slightly on the exhaust side. We couldn't dig up any meaningful information or schematics on its mysterious "Updraft Floating Balance" bearing though Phanteks claims is raises the axis to increase its MTBF (mean time before failure) to an unheard of 17+ years.


The stock fans running at 6V measured 18 dBA@1m.

The stock fans are among the best 14 cm models we've encountered. At 9V (1050 RPM) and above, they were whiny as most fans tend to be, but they had a very nice smooth sound at lower levels. There was no audible tonality or bearing chatter, even at close proximity, which is incredibly rare in our experience.

Stock Fan Measurements
Voltage
One Fan
Two Fans
Speed
SPL@1m
Avg. Speed
12V
1360 RPM
32 dBA
33 dBA
1260 RPM
9V
1130 RPM
26 dBA
27 dBA
1050 RPM
7V
940 RPM
20 dBA
21 dBA
880 RPM
6V
830 RPM
17 dBA
18 dBA
790 RPM
5V
710 RPM
14 dBA
14~15 dBA
680 RPM
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from the center of the heatsink.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

The two included fans were close in speed to one another, differing by 40 RPM at most, so we didn't experience any noticeable intermodulation effects. Strangely when the outer fan was removed, the fan at the center increased in speed by 30 ~ 100 RPM depending on the voltage. As a result, the noise levels were pretty similar whether we had one or both fans mounted. The fans became quiet at about 7V (close to 900 RPM).

TEST RESULTS

Test Results: Phanteks PH-TC14PE
Fan Voltage
One Fan
Two Fans
SPL@1m
Thermal Rise
SPL@1m
Stock 140mm Fan
12V
32 dBA
38°C
35°C
33 dBA
9V
26 dBA
39°C
37°C
27 dBA
8V
20 dBA
42°C
38°C
21 dBA
7V
17 dBA
45°C
39°C
18 dBA
6V
14 dBA
48°C
41°C
14~15 dBA
Reference 140mm Fan: Noctua NF-P14
12V
29 dBA
39°C
36°C
32 dBA
9V
21~22 dBA
42°C
38°C
24 dBA
8V
18 dBA
43°C
39°C
20~21 dBA
7V
15 dBA
45°C
41°C
17 dBA
6V
12~13 dBA
48°C
43°C
13 dBA

Not only did the PH-TC14PE's stock fans sound good, they were excellent performers as well. In single fan configuration, the Phantek fan kept pace with our reference Noctua fan, putting up similar temperatures at comparable noise levels. In dual fan mode, the stock fans took over, producing similar thermal results with a 2~3 dB reduction.

On most high-end coolers we typically see a decrease of 2~3°C when a second fan is added to the mix. As the PH-TC14PE is designed with dual fan operation in mind the difference was much larger, especially at low speeds. At 7V and 6V, the thermal rise dropped by 6°C and 7°C respectively.



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