Lenovo ThinkCentre M92z All-In-One Desktop PC

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TEST RESULTS

Thermals, Power Consumption & Noise

System Measurements
System State
Temps
Power (AC)
SPL @0.6m†
CPU
HDD
Ext*
Off
N/A
1W
N/A
Sleep (S3)
N/A
2W
N/A
Idle
(screen off)
N/A
24W
19 dBA
Idle (max. brightness)
N/A
48W
19 dBA
Idle (typ. Brightness)
35°C
34°C
32°C
39W
19 dBA
H.264 Playback
40°C
36°C
33°C
49W
19 dBA
TMPGEnc Encoding
75°C
39°C
52°C
86W
20~21 dBA
CPU Load
80°C
39°C
52°C
109W
28 dBA
CPU + GPU Load
85°C
39°C
52°C
130W
28 dBA
Ambient: 20°C, 10~11 dBA.
*External temperature measured using an IR thermometer pointed at the hottest portion of the external chassis (near the center of the exhaust port).
We measure SPL at 0.6m for all devices meant to be used atop a desk, as it is more realistic a distance than the usual 1m. It also corresponds to the "seated user SPL" distance specified in the computer noise measurement standard ISO 7779.

Considering the M92z also has to power a 23 inch 1080p monitor, it's a very energy efficient system, idling at 39W and using a maximum of 130W on full synthetic GPU and GPU load. As the system consumes 24W when the screen is disabled, at typical brightness, the monitor uses about 15W.

The system runs fairly cool when it's not being heavily taxed. Running Prime95 pushed the CPU to 80°C and adding FurMark to the load brought it up to 85°C. Video encoding with TMPGEnc is a more realistic stress test, but even then, 75°C is a bit toasty. That being said, the CPU never throttled during any of our tests.

The noise level of machine is excellent, measuring only 19 dBA@0.6m (typical seated user distance as per ISO 7779). TMPGEnc only increased the SPL by 1~2 dB. Only synthetic loads would make the system significantly louder. As the display sits between the machine's only fan, much of the noise produced is blocked from the user.


The fan does has some tonal qualities, and is a bit clicky, but these were only noticeable from the back of the machine. Sitting in front, it wasn't very offensive though not super smooth, either. We got used to it after a few minutes of operation and it sort of blended away into the background.

PERFORMANCE

CPU & GPU

Our configuration features an i7-3770S, a low power version of the i7-3770K which we reviewed earlier this year. It has a lower TDP (65W vs. 77W) and includes virtualization and security features not found on the "K" series (vPro, VT-d, Intel Trusted Execution Technology), but it's clocked at 3.1 GHz instead of 3.5 GHz, though the maximum Turbo Boost speed is the same at 3.9 GHz. On paper, the 3770S should be slower in multi-threaded workloads but according to CPU-Z, it was clocked at 3.5 GHz throughout our synthetic load testing. So performance-wise, the two chips are almost identical.

The integrated HD 4000 graphics is also the same. Its 3D performance is similar to that of an entry level graphics card like the Radeon HD 5450, so don't expect much in the way of gaming performance. It is very adept at rendering high definition video though.

Hard Drive


HD Tune Read benchmark result.

In CrystalDiskMark, the M92z's Barracuda 1TB hard drive scored results similar to the WD Red 3TB (one of the faster drives we've tested despite it running at 5,400 RPM). While this is fairly quick for a mechanical hard drive, it's not nearly as snappy as an SSD. Lenovo does offer the option for one, but it's an extra US$220 for only 64GB.

Boot performance was surprisingly good for a hard drive. There isn't much delay in the pre-O/S process with the "Starting Windows" screen appearing 10.8 seconds after engaging the power button. It took about 49 seconds in total until we heard the Windows startup chime ringing out.

USB 3.0


HD Tune Read benchmark result.

According to the specifications, our USB 3.0 dock is limited to 5 Gbps but most of the controllers we've tested it with fail to achieve even half of that figure despite using a SandForce drive (Kingston HyperX 3K 120GB) and an easily compressible data set. The Intel controller on the M92z is native to the Q77 chipset and it performs on par with the best we've encountered, the VIA VL800 controller on the Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H.



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