Cooler Master Seidon 240M: Dual Fan Liquid CPU Cooler

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Test Results: Open Platform

Test Results: Cooler Master Seidon 240M
Fan Voltage
Avg. Fan Speed
SPL@1m
Thermal Rise
Pump at 12V
12V
2220 RPM
44 dBA
33°C
9V
1630 RPM
35 dBA
34°C
7V
1140 RPM
25 dBA
36°C
6V
880 RPM
22 dBA
39°C
5.5V
750 RPM
20 dBA
42°C
5V
460 RPM
19 dBA
53°C
Pump at 7V
12V
2220 RPM
44 dBA
36°C
9V
1630 RPM
35 dBA
37°C
7V
1140 RPM
25 dBA
38°C
6V
880 RPM
19 dBA
40°C
5.5V
750 RPM
17 dBA
43°C
5V
460 RPM
14 dBA
53°C
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from the center of the heatsink.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

We tested the pump at 12V and 7V with varying fan speeds in attempt to find the perfect balance for our open CPU cooling testbed. At high fan voltages (7V to 12V) the higher pump speed generated 2~3°C better cooling; the overall noise levels were the same for both pump speeds as the fans drowned them out. The lower pump speed only proved to be quieter when the fans were dropped to 6V and below. The performance-to-noise ratio was considerably stronger at the slower pump speed.

High-End CPU Coolers (ref. 140mm fans):
CPU °C Rise Comparison
Heatsink
Fan Voltage / SPL*
7V / 15~17 dBA
6V / 12~14 dBA
Prolimatech Genesis
37
39
Thermalright HR-02 Macho
37
40
Noctua NH-C14
39
41
Thermalright Silver Arrow
39
41
Noctua NH-D14
40
42
Phanteks PH-TC14PE
41
43
NZXT Havik 140
40
43
SilverStone Heligon HE02
44
46
Cooler Master Seidon 240M (stock 120 mm fans, pump at 7V)
43 (5.5V)
53 (5V)
*Note: there are minor differences in measured SPL due to the variety of fan orientations and mounting methods offered by the compared coolers.

Given its US$100 price-tag, the Seidon 240M should be competitive with high-end dual fan air coolers but it falls well short, at least at the noise levels SPCR considers relevant. The cooling performance trails many such models by double digits at the ultra quiet 12~14 dBA@1m level.

CPU Cooler Comparison (stock 120mm fans)
Cooler
Pump / Fan Voltage
SPL@1m
Thermal Rise
Antec Kühler H20 920
7V / 5.6V
19 dBA
41°C
Antec Kühler H20 620
7V / 6V
18~19 dBA
44°C
CM Seidon 240M
7V / 6V
19 dBA
40°C
7V / 5.5V
17 dBA
43°C
7V / 5V
14 dBA
53°C
Phanteks PH-TC12DX
N/A / 7V
23 dBA
42°C
N/A / 6V
18 dBA
44°C
N/A / 5V
14 dBA
47°C
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from the center of the heatsink.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

The Seidon 240M barely edges the Antec Kühler H20 920 we examined a couple of years back. The 920, with its single fan on a very thick radiator, was bested by only a single degree. Combing through our smaller heatsink reviews, we found that the Phanteks PH-TC12DX equipped with a single stock 120 mm fan was the 240M's closest analog on our open testbed, except for a strong advantage at very low fan speeds.

There's no point comparing the Seidon 240M to any of the top ranked air heatsinks in our test database; they will clearly outperform the Seidon. The Phanteks TC12DX is a solid heatsink hindered somewhat by poor fan performance. Still, it's a suitable choice to go up against the 240M in an in-case test.

IN-CASE TESTING

For our in-case test, we installed our LGA1366 CPU heatsink platform into an Antec P280 case with the stock rear and front fans left in place and running on low speed. The noise level of the system without the 240M running was just 14 dBA@1m so it had only a minor effect on the overall noise level. The 240M's radiator was secured to the case top panel with the fans blowing out, while the Phanteks PH-TC12DX was mounted blowing to the side and the top fan mounts left empty.

Our mic was placed one meter away from the side of the case at a diagonal, so each cooler had the acoustic advantage of being placed further away (than in free air testing) and a side panel blocking some of the sound.

Cooler Master Seidon 240M (pump at 7V)
Fan Voltage
Avg. Fan Speed
SPL@1m
Thermal Rise
6V
880 RPM
21~22 dBA
41°C
5.5V
750 RPM
18 dBA
44°C
5V
460 RPM
15 dBA
54°C
Phanteks PH-TC12DX (one stock 120mm fan)
7V
1100 RPM
18~19 dBA
45°C
6V
940 RPM
16 dBA
47°C
5V
750 RPM
15~16 dBA
50°C
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from the center of the left side panel.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

The Seidon 240M performed just as well in our open platform while the TC12DX cooler took a 3°C hit across the board — the 240M had the obvious advantage of being able to expel heat directly out the top of the case. However, tucked inside the case, the overall noise from the Phanteks was reduced at both 7V and 6V; the case obscured some of the noise it was producing. The noise level of Seidon 240M, on the other hand, increased slightly when mounted in the case. It would seem that the interaction between the radiator and the case, the metal-on-metal contact (even with the dampening pads in place) and vertical orientation (compared to the horizontal placement of our open testbed) made for a louder system.

These differences more or less canceled each other out, so the two coolers were still closely comparable, with the exception of ultra-low airflow performance. With each cooler's fans at 5V, the Seidon 240M's cooling proficiency fell apart, while the TC12DX remained resilient. The bottom line is the 240M's tightly wound coils need higher airflow. It's also important to note that the TC12DX was helped along by only one rear case exhaust fan while the top two fan mounts were left unoccupied, putting the Phanteks at somewhat of a disadvantage.

 



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