Habey MITX-6771 Bay Trail Embedded Motherboard

CPUs|Motherboards
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Energy Efficiency

Note: all systems compared have similar hardware: Single SSD and a DC power supply with high efficiency 12V/19V adapter.

Despite having a 10W SoC, our MITX-6771 based system used noticeably more power than Ivy Bridge and Haswell based NUCs when idle, probably due to the demands of the bigger from factor and more varied feature support. It was considerably more efficient than any mini-ITX board we've tested thus far though, beating out the Kabini-equipped ASUS AM1I-A by a considerable margin. Power consumption during 1080p video playback was especially impressive, only 1~2W more than when sitting idle.

Heavy load is where the MITX-6771 truly shines, staying under 20W during video encoding and a run through the Crysis Demo. True, it is the slowest system of the field, but keep in mind the Athlon 5350 configuration, only 5% faster overall, used around 30W in the same tests.

Thermals

System Measurements (Extended Use)
System State
TMPGEnc Video Encoding
Prime95
Resident Evil 5 Benchmark Demo
Prime95 + FurMark
Core Temp
(Average)
57°C
61°C
65°C
75°C
MB Temp
34°C
36°C
37°C
39°C
Aux Temp
43°C
47°C
52°C
61°C
SSD Temp
47°C
47°C
47°C
48°C
Heatsink Temp*
55°C
61°C
67°C
78°C
System Power (AC)
16W
17W
20W
23W
*measured externally at the hottest point on the heatsink
Ambient temperature: 21°C.

To test how well the fanless heatsink works, we conducted some extended use tests to really heat things up. The more demanding applications drove the passive cooler to temperatures between 60°C and 80°C, but at no point did the CPU throttle. During the Resident Evil 5 test, the CPU clock speed fluctuated between 1.3 and 2.4 GHz but this was apparently normal behavior unrelated to the heat. It behaved similarly at the start of the test before the machine even had time to heat up, and the processor stayed at 2.4 GHz during the more demanding Prime95 + FurMark test. The heatsink is small but adequate, at least in open air.


SpeedFan with sensor names correlated to AIDA64.

As the MITX-6771 doesn't come with any additional software other than drivers, we monitored the thermal conditions with SpeedFan and AIDA64. Both programs picked up a single fan speed, and motherboard and "AUX" temperature sensors. Fan control was enabled in SpeedFan by going to the advanced menu and changing the "PWM 1 mode" setting from "ON/OFF" to "Software controlled" but we encountered the same squealing problem as when we changed the speed in the BIOS.



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