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EFFECT OF DUST FILTERS ON AIRFLOW

Our Kanomax 6803 Anemometer does not get much mention in SPCR, and only brief use in extended fan tests. This is an expensive ($845 today) instrument of high precision able to read as little as 40 FPM air velocity to as high as 7800 FPM with 1% accuracy. I spent an hour with the Kanomax 6803, the mounted fans in the Air 240 case, and the removed dust filters. The results are discussed in the captions for the revealing photos below.


The vane of the anenometer was placed over the top fan, set up as an intake. Note that the dust filter was removed from this panel. The linear velocity of the air reads 254 Feet Per Minute (from which CFM is calculated).


The removed filter was placed atop the fan. FPM dropped to just 159. That's a 38% drop. Or if you start with the filter on, a 60% increase when the filter is removed.


The anenometer was placed at the front vent, whose filter was also removed. The fan is blowing out, and air speed measures 300 FPM.

With the filter in place, 139 FPM. That's a loss of 53% with the filter, or if you start with the filter in place, a gain of 116%.


The filter from the Rosewill W1-S case in place of the Air 240 filter: The air speed drops only by a third instead of more than half.

One interesting aspect of these experiments is that I could easily hear the effect of the filters on fan speed: It actually went to a lower pitch and got slightly rougher sounding, with more turbulence. It was clear that the fan speed was reduced by the filter.

All this tells us that when used on the intake side of the fan, Corsair's dust filter blocks about 40% of the airflow. Used on the exhaust side, it blocks over 50%. With this solid new evidence of just how restrictive the dust filters in the Corsair Air 240 are, there's no getting around my need to revisit this build with all filters removed. Yes, PC silencing is an iterative process.



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