Asus GTX 980 Ti Strix OC Graphics Card

Graphics Cards
Viewing page 4 of 7 pages. Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next

TEST RESULTS

System Measurements: GPU Test System with Asus Strix GTX 980 Ti OC
State
Idle
Prime95
Resident Evil 6 (Peak)
Prime95 + FurMark
GPU Fan Speed
Off
1280 RPM (40%)
880 RPM (35%)*
2070 RPM (52%)
2170 RPM (54%)*
CPU Temp
20°C
41°C
46°C
48°C
63°C
64°C
MB Temp
24°C
33°C
39°C
41°C
46°C
47°C
GPU Temp
42°C
47°C
72°C
80°C
82°C
80°C
GPU Core Clock
135 MHz
1418 MHz
1405 MHz
1227 MHz
System Power (AC)
44W
83W
262W
265W
368W
367W
12~13 dBA
17~18 dBA
15 dBA
28 dBA
29~30 dBA
*fan speed adjusted manually to hit 80°C target
CPU fan at 500 RPM, system fans at 580 RPM.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA
System noise level (on int. graphics): 12~13 dBA
Ambient temperature: 21°C

The Strix GTX 980 Ti OC, like previous members of the Strix line, shuts its fans off completely when they're not needed. As a result, the same minuscule level of noise is produced as when the video card is not present, a mere 12~13 [email protected] Prime95 only stresses the CPU, warming it up by 21°C compared to idle, but also affects the motherboard and GPU temperatures by a moderate amount.

Our Resident Evil 6 benchmark puts a greater combined load on the system, more than tripling system power draw to 262W AC during the most demanding portions of the test.. The GPU fans kick into gear here, peaking at 1280 RPM, increasing the total noise output by 5 dB. The fan control system is a bit aggressive, pushing the fan hard enough to keep the core temperature at 72°C. Manually relaxing the fan speed to allow for an 80°C temperature brings the noise level down to a very quiet 15 [email protected]

Prime95 + FurMark, a full synthetic torture test, is considerably more demanding, putting the GPU over the 80°C mark, heating the CPU to north of 60°C and the motherboard temperature sensor by a lesser degree. In this state, the fans ramp up to over 2000 RPM, making the machine a noisy 28 [email protected] The temperature is high enough that the GPU downclocks significantly, dropping it by 180~190 MHz compared to the Resident Evil 6 benchmark.

The GPU fans aren't great acoustically but inside a case like the Define R5 with noise damping, the resulting output is quite tolerable. At lower speeds (under ~1500 RPM), they produce a dull low pitched hum which is noticeable but not really unpleasant when observed in our anechoic chamber from a distance of one meter. At higher speeds, they're louder of course, but the resulting noise is more balanced with a greater high frequency distribution. It sounds fairly smooth, verging on whiny, but doesn't quite get there. The card also emits some faint coil whine that is more prominent during Resident Evil 6 than FurMark.

On a side note, at the fans' lowest fan speed setting of 30%, they spin at about 470 RPM which is not fast enough to make any measurable noise impact on our test system.

Comparison: GPU Test System, Resident Evil 6 (Peak, 80°C Target Temp)
GPU Model
CPU Temp
GPU Temp
Clock Speed
GPU Fan Speed
SPL @1m
System Power (AC)
Zotac GTX 970 Extreme Core
46°C
72°C
1418 MHz
1090 RPM (minimum)
14 dBA
215W
Asus GTX 980 Strix
45°C
80°C
1304 MHz
810 RPM
14~15 dBA
234W
Asus GTX 980 Ti Strix OC
48°C
80°C
1405 MHz
880 RPM
15 dBA
265W
AMD R9 290X (reference)
40°C
80°C
1000 MHz
3680 RPM
37~38 dBA
318W
CPU fan at 500 RPM, system fans at 580 RPM.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA
System noise level (on int. graphics): 12~13 dBA
Ambient temperature: 21°C

As individual video cards are equipped with fan control systems of varying aggressiveness, comparing physical characteristics is unfair without controlling for a single factor. The comparison table above has been taken into consideration using results obtained by manipulating the fans to achieve the same 80°C GPU temperature (at 21°C ambient) during our Resident Evil 6 test. Note, that one card, the Zotac GTX 970 Extreme Core actually cannot attain the 80°C mark as it's so well cooled that the minimum fan speed keeps it closer to 70°C.

Under these conditions, the GTX 980 Ti Strix operates similarly to the GTX 980 Strix, running a bit hotter, and just barely noisier. All three GTX 900 models are orders of magnitude quieter than the reference R9 290X, which has a TDP of 290W, 40W higher than the 980 Ti. It's equipped with a blower style cooling solution that gets incredibly loud but is more effective at dumping exhaust out of the case, resulting in a cooler running CPU.

Comparison: GPU Test System, Prime95 + FurMark (80°C Target Temp)
GPU Model
CPU Temp
GPU Temp
Clock Speed (% vs. RE6)*
GPU Fan Speed
SPL @1m
System Power (AC)
Zotac GTX 970 Extreme Core
57°C
74°C
1001 MHz (70.6%)
1090 RPM (min)
14 dBA
228W
Asus GTX 980 Strix
57°C
80°C
1088 MHz (83.4%)
980 RPM
16~17 dBA
260W
Asus GTX 980 Ti Strix OC
64°C
80°C
1227 MHz (87.3%)
2170 RPM
29~30 dBA
367W
AMD R9 290X (reference)
46°C
80°C
905 MHz (90.5%)
3560 RPM
48 dBA
373W
*Percentage of clock speed compared to Resident Evil 6 test (peak, auto fan control).
CPU fan at 500 RPM, system fans at 580 RPM.
Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA
System noise level (on int. graphics): 12~13 dBA
Ambient temperature: 21°C

Comparing Prime95 + FurMark using the same parameters yields different results and comes with complications due to the way modern GPUs adjust their clock speed in response to temperature, something that can't be changed without hacking the BIOS. However, the difference in clock speeds between this test and the Resident Evil 6 test is shown, so you can see exactly how much each card slows down.

The 980 Ti's theoretical power draw is much higher than in actual games, so its fans have to spin more than twice as fast as the GTX 980 Strix and Zotac GTX 970 Extreme Core, resulting in a noise output of close to 30 dBA. As for the clock speed, it doesn't throttle as hard as the GTX 980 and GTX 970, operating about 13% slower than in the Resident Evil 6 test.



Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next

Graphics Cards - Article Index
Help support this site, buy from one of our affiliate retailers!
Search: