Thermaltake Duorb VGA Cooler: Are Two Orbs Better Than One?

Cooling
Viewing page 5 of 6 pages. Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next

TEST RESULTS

With the Duorb being fairly light and only occupying one extra slot, it was very easy to install the test card.


Installed in our test system.


Test Results: ATI Radeon X1950XTX + Thermaltake Duorb
State
Fan Voltage
Fan Speed
System Noise
GPU Temp.
VGA Amb.
CPU Temp.
System Power
Idle
5V
~1200 RPM
18 dBA
45°C
42°C
27°C
103W
CPUBurn
5V
~1200 RPM
18 dBA
48°C
44°C
50°C
187W
CPUBurn + ATITool
5V
~1200 RPM
18 dBA
77°C
59°C
56°C
267W
7V
~1510 RPM
22 dBA
77°C
59°C
56°C
266W
9V
~1890 RPM
26 dBA
76°C
59°C
57°C
266W
12V
~2580 RPM
31 dBA
75°C
58°C
57°C
266W
VGA fan speed approximated via Stroboscope.

ACOUSTICS

Fans @ 12V: The fans were very loud with much high-pitched turbulence. Performance was fairly good with a GPU temperature of 75°C.

Fans @ 9V: The noise level was much improved but it was still whiney and turbulent. The GPU temperature barely changed from 12V, only 1°C

Fans @ 7V: While they can pass for 'quiet' at this speed, the fans were still quite buzzy and the reduction in noise level allowed an odd, intermittent electrical squeal to become audible. Performance was only reduced by a single degree.

Fans @ 5V: Very quiet, with a low-pitched mechanical hum evident close-up. Inside the case, it was inaudible. The GPU temperature did not budge compared to 7V.

The interaction between the fans generated a lot of noise — each fan on its own was not that bad, but when their output streams collided it created a lot of extra turbulence. If they were spaced further apart, the acoustics would have been better. Alas, the results show that all that extra airflow and noise amounted to almost nothing — there was barely any change in cooling performance when the fan speed was lowered. We found the fans' starting voltage was about 3.7V (not 7V as listed in the specifications) so they are prime candidates for undervolting — a built-in fan controller (even a manual one) would have been a godsend.

The results may have been skewed by our mounting problems, but they would have been slight. Good, tight contact was being made between the GPU core and heatsink base.

COMPARISONS

Thermaltake Duorb vs. Zalman VF1000 vs. Xigmatek Battle-Axe
Fan Speed
Zalman VF1000
Thermaltake Duorb
Xigmatek
Battle-Axe
Noise Level
GPU Temp.
Noise Level
GPU Temp.
Noise Level
GPU Temp.
12V
35 dBA
71°C
35 dBA
72°C
39 dBA
71°C
9V
30 dBA
73°C
30 dBA
73°C
34 dBA
70°C
7V
26 dBA
75°C
25 dBA
74°C
26 dBA
71°C
5V
20 dBA
77°C
19 dBA
74°C
20 dBA
70°C
Noise levels were measured in open air. 3°C was subtracted from the results of the Duorb as the ambient temperature was 3°C lower at the time the other coolers were tested.

The Duorb, with two heatpipes and two fans, more or less matched the performance delivered by the Zalman VF1000, with its four heatpipes and one fan. The noise levels between the two were comparable as well. The Xigmatek Battle-Axe edges them by a small margin, keeping the GPU at about 70°C no matter how fast the fans were spinning. To date the only cooler that has broken 70°C at load on our test VGA card is the Arctic Cooling Accelero S1 paired with a Nexus 120mm fan.



Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next

Cooling - Article Index
Help support this site, buy the ThermalTake CL-G0102 DuOrb VGA Cooler from one of our affiliate retailers!