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 Post subject: Shuttle XPC SG33G5 with (noisy) PC40N250EV PSU
PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:16 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:02 am
Posts: 2
Hi all.

I got hold of a Shuttle XPC SG33G5 some months back, and equipped it with a Q6600 CPU and 4 GB of RAM (using the integrated GPU).

When I turned it on, I noticed that it made a lot more noise than expected, and found out that it wasn't the ICE fan (which I've since exchanged for a Nexus one), but the PSU fans.
It's going to be used for mixing music, so I'd like it to run as quiet as possible.

The PSU is a PC40N250EV (ELAN VITAL 250W POWER "SilentX")

I'm considering upgrading to a PC50 or changing the two internal fans. Which is the better option and will make the most difference? What about getting a PC50 and changing the fans in it? :)

And why couldn't Shuttle just continue with the external PSU that they had on one of their earlier models!...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:58 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:02 am
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From the product sheets on Shuttle's site it seems the PC40 ~35 dbA and the PC 50 is <30 dB (A-weighted I assume). I'd guess that is a pretty noticeable difference.
It also says that the PC50 has Smart Fan-control in the product sheet, and it links to the drivers page on the PC50 product page, so I guess you could control the rpm with XPCTools? Is it possible or am I exciting myself over nothing?


http://global.shuttle.com/product_detail.jsp?PI=429
http://global.shuttle.com/product_detail.jsp?PI=428


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 25, 2007 2:14 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 1:49 am
Posts: 5
Location: Australia
I have both PC40 and PC50 PSU's.

They both use 2 x Delta EFB0412MD 40x40x20mm fans.

The speed of the fans are regulated by a sensor located on the PSU's PCB.

I understand (but haven't measured) that the PC40 supplies about 6 volts to the fans at following startup and then about 8 volts, if during operation the temperature inside the PSU increases significantly.

The fans in the PC50 definitely run slower at startup and I suspect their voltage is about 5 volts following startup.

Running the PC50 increased all component temperatures by 2ºC compared to the PC40.

The best straight replacement fan for these Delta's is the Papst 412 40x40x20mm fan as its' maximum RPM is close to that of the stock Delta and are significantly quieter in operation.
As the screw holes are a larger diameter than normal, you need to plug these to half depth , with say a two pack epoxy, then when hardened drill pilot holes for the screws.
The PSU fan headers are small, so either use the ones from the Delta's or get similar.

Using the Papst fans definitely lowers the noise level without increasing the temperature and in a PC40 the noise is less noticeable than a PC50 with its' stock Delta fans.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 9:48 am 
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Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 4:29 pm
Posts: 5
you should post an image tutorial on how to do all of that :)

but there are some conflicting reports

http://www.motherboardpoint.com/t32198- ... n41g2.html


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 6:05 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 1:49 am
Posts: 5
Location: Australia
On the contrary burkeytonk, there is no conflict whatsoever.

paranoise's SG33G5 has a Shuttle SilentX PC40N250EV 250W (re-badged Elan Vital) PSU.

The post you link to is from 2003 and deals with a SN41G2 which either came with an Enhance ENP-2320 or a Achme AM630B PSU as stock, that had no thermal sensoring, a single 40x40x10mm ball bearing fan, and ran at full RPM's.


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 Post subject: Shuttle PC62
PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 12:12 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 03, 2006 8:18 am
Posts: 20
Location: Seattle, WA
I just received the Shuttle PC62 power supply.

For those not familiar with it, it uses the 200W external power brick similar to the famous (infamous?) Dell Y2515. In conjunction with a passive DC/DC converter to produce 5 and 3.3v rails, it creates a totally passive power system for most G series Shuttles.

The limitation is 200W, but with prudent selection of components, 200W isn't really much of a limitation.

In my Shuttle, I've replaced the fan with a Nexus 80mm mounted using the soft rubber mounts, and with this power supply, the only noise from the unit is the hard drive. I tested briefly with a 2.5" solid state drive, and the unit was completely silent. I have not put a CD in the optical drive, so I don't know how much noise that would be, but that's to be expected.

I'll be testing this power supply with a Dell XPS 200/210 shortly, as well as seeing if I can use it in my full ATX setup as well. Since it's Shuttle's odd form factor G power supply, fitting it in other cases could be challenging. Also the cables are fairly short, as they are intended/measured for the G.

At $100 each, they aren't cheap, but to get rid of the 40mm fans in the power supplies is priceless to my ears.

- Ken


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 Post subject: Re: Shuttle PC62
PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 6:54 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2005 3:31 am
Posts: 9
k2tsai wrote:
I just received the Shuttle PC62 power supply.

For those not familiar with it, it uses the 200W external power brick similar to the famous (infamous?) Dell Y2515. In conjunction with a passive DC/DC converter to produce 5 and 3.3v rails, it creates a totally passive power system for most G series Shuttles.

The limitation is 200W, but with prudent selection of components, 200W isn't really much of a limitation.

In my Shuttle, I've replaced the fan with a Nexus 80mm mounted using the soft rubber mounts, and with this power supply, the only noise from the unit is the hard drive. I tested briefly with a 2.5" solid state drive, and the unit was completely silent. I have not put a CD in the optical drive, so I don't know how much noise that would be, but that's to be expected.

I'll be testing this power supply with a Dell XPS 200/210 shortly, as well as seeing if I can use it in my full ATX setup as well. Since it's Shuttle's odd form factor G power supply, fitting it in other cases could be challenging. Also the cables are fairly short, as they are intended/measured for the G.

At $100 each, they aren't cheap, but to get rid of the 40mm fans in the power supplies is priceless to my ears.

- Ken


What is the heat of the internal component like? I am considering buying the PC62, but if it doesn't reduce heat on the inside and therefore the 80mm fan on the heatpipe has to run like mad all the time then I might have to consider another solution.


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 Post subject: Shuttle PC62
PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2008 2:38 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2008 2:32 pm
Posts: 1
Location: decatur, ga USA
Hi, I have the same chassis and the same noise problem. How did the PC62 work out. I have a SG33G5 with 1 HDD, 1 Optical Drive 2 X 2GB sticks of RAM and a E8400 Core 2 Duo CPU. Nothing else. I think the 200W PS will work. Your thoughts?


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