It is currently Tue Apr 22, 2014 11:22 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: More efficient wall-warts
PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2007 3:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu May 03, 2007 12:44 am
Posts: 10
Location: Arlesey, Beds, UK
I'm in search of a new router and one thing I would like from it is for the power supply to not generate so much heat as to be almost too hot to touch. That seems like a real waste. I realise that these things are built down to a price, but do any manufacturers use better power supplies? I'm looking at basic Linksys and D-Link routers. My old one that is dying was a ZyXEL.

These power supplies annoy me in general. I have to run several for things like my cable model, speakers etc. I do turn them all off at the end of the day, so at least they are not running 24/7.

Any thoughts?

_________________
Steve
AMD X2 4600+ on Asus M2npv-vm in Antec NSK4400. 2GB RAM, 250GB PATA HD, Haupauge DVB-T PCI


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2007 5:58 am 
Offline
Patron of SPCR

Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2005 5:13 pm
Posts: 169
Location: South FL
My Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 has one of those quasi-wall warts where a cord runs from the wall outlet to the transformer, from which it can be removed, and then another, different wire runs into the router from there. It's pretty small and stays just noticeably warm when plugged in 24/7. I also love the router.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2007 11:42 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:59 pm
Posts: 157
Location: San Diego, CA
The technology is there to build efficient "wall warts". Look at your typical cell-phone charger these days, they don't get warm at all when left plugged in and don't even register on my Kill-a-watt.

I would love to be able to get rid of the half-dozen or so inefficient wall warts I have for my things like speakers, routers, battery chargers, etc.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2007 8:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2005 7:54 pm
Posts: 301
Location: Oz
My Draytek Vigor router uses 4w when on, 5w when making a VOIP call from it and 0w when switch off.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2007 5:45 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2002 3:26 pm
Posts: 191
Swapping one wall wart for another is pretty easy - just make sure the replacement has the same
- plug size
- plug polarity
- output type (AC or DC)
- voltage
- wattage (it's OK to have more wattage than the one you're replacing)

"Switching type" wall warts tend to be more efficient, although they're seldom marked as such. One way to get an idea is to plug a 'wart into a kill-a-watt with no load - it should register zero. Another way is simply the weight (switching 'warts tend to be a lot lighter for the same wattage).

There are three variables in plug size:
- inner diameter
- outer diameter
- depth

The easiest way to get a match is to head down to your local radio shack - they usually have an assortment of "dummy plugs" (look for a hanging keyring-like-thing near where their replacement warts and plugs are sold). Yes, RS personnel can sometimes be offensive in their urge to sell you as much as they can. Remember that they are salespeople not techies, so often very basic technical questions can drive them to the other end of the store (or as I like to joke about their slogan : "You have questions - we have deer-in-the-headlights"). Ask enough questions and they will sidle away when you come into the store (stuff like "are these resistors 5% or 10%?").
Anyway, bring the piece of gear the wart is going to be plugged into with you and try all the plugs until you find a fit. That'll be marked outer dia/inner dia/depth. Write that down.
Then (via the web) head over to some surplus electronics places - like American Science and Surplus - or try a froogle search for "AC adapter". It does take a bit of looking.
Note that if the piece of gear you're going to run is 12VDC or 5VDC and only needs to be on when your PC is on (and can be located near your PC) you can just run it from your PC's power (you do have high-efficiency PC PSs, right?). There are power pass-through brackets (I got mine at NexFan.com - but they're obscurely-enough listed that I can't find 'em now).

Finally - audio amplifiers do tend to work better with the old non-switching power supplies. The new "Super T" amps seem to be OK with switchers, but otherwise I wouldn't make this swap for an amp.

Hoping some of this helps...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2008 7:50 pm
Posts: 6
Location: United Kingdom
bobkoure wrote:
Note that if the piece of gear you're going to run is 12VDC or 5VDC and only needs to be on when your PC is on (and can be located near your PC) you can just run it from your PC's power (you do have high-efficiency PC PSs, right?). There are power pass-through brackets (I got mine at NexFan.com - but they're obscurely-enough listed that I can't find 'em now).


Very intriguing, I had never thought of doing this. I have a 24/7 server running right next to my modem/gateway/router/wireless, a Vonage VOIP router, and a cordless phone... I'm now investigating the idea of all three "riding" on my server's high-efficiency power supply.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 6:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Feb 13, 2007 7:28 pm
Posts: 1406
Location: USA
bobkoure wrote:
Note that if the piece of gear you're going to run is 12VDC or 5VDC and only needs to be on when your PC is on (and can be located near your PC) you can just run it from your PC's power (you do have high-efficiency PC PSs, right?). There are power pass-through brackets (I got mine at NexFan.com - but they're obscurely-enough listed that I can't find 'em now).

You mean something like this or this? You'd still need to make/buy an adapter cable that had the right interface for your external device, though. Probably the best way would be to snip of the cord of your existing wall wart and use that as a starting point.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 13, 2008 7:25 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2005 8:35 pm
Posts: 270
Location: CA
I have the D-Link DGS2208 switch and the wart seems very efficient as is the switch itself. With ports unloaded the device takes less than 1 Watt. I would assume their "Green Ethernet" routers are the same although I haven't specifically tested one.

http://www.dlink.com/corporate/environment/dlink-green-ethernet/

_________________
My "quiet PC" build: E7500@stock, Ninja RevB (passive), Gigabyte DS3, Corsair 520HX, Antec Solo, Sapphire 5750 Vapor-X , WD Velociraptor, 4Gb G.Skill DDR2-800.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2008 2:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2002 3:26 pm
Posts: 191
jessekopelman wrote:
You mean something like this or this?

Yep.
The easiest way to make an adapter cable is to get some molex "shells" and some "pins". The pins crimp on the conductors of your wire, then push into the shell.
The cheapest way to get barrel connectors (particularly unusual sizes) is to find a cheap 'wart that has the barrel you need and snip.
While you're at this, look at the different barrel connectors for the equipment you've got. Are there any that are the same size but need to be supplying different voltage? You might want to tag the connectors and matching equipment. I used dots of nail polish (borrowed from teenager next-door).


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group