It is currently Thu Jul 10, 2014 3:16 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 35 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Noctua / Coolink Tower Heatsinks
PostPosted: Wed Jan 18, 2006 4:46 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2002 3:26 pm
Posts: 11805
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Noctua / Coolink Tower Heatsinks

_________________
Mike Chin,
Editor/Publisher, SPCR
Support SPCR with your donations!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 10:44 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue May 24, 2005 8:22 pm
Posts: 2465
Location: London
Is it only me, or does that fan speed controller dial (seen here) look a lot like the one on a Scythe Samurai (seen here)?

_________________
Thinkpad X200 – aging fan, T60p – Core Duo whine :(
Nothing endures but change


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:33 am 
Offline
*Lifetime Patron*

Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 10:39 am
Posts: 288
qviri wrote:
Is it only me, or does that fan speed controller dial (seen here) look a lot like the one on a Scythe Samurai (seen here)?


I think its just you...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 12:08 pm 
Offline
SPCR Reviewer

Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2002 3:26 pm
Posts: 3998
Location: Phoenix, AZ
qviri wrote:
Is it only me, or does that fan speed controller dial (seen here) look a lot like the one on a Scythe Samurai (seen here)?



Actually, it looks like a lot of people's fan controller...pretty much right out of the generic component stock bin. You can buy those pot's at Radio Shack for about a dollar. Not that that's a bad thing...if's it's not broke.... :lol:

_________________
Senior Contributing Writer, SPCR


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 2:13 pm 
Offline
*Lifetime Patron*

Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 7:05 am
Posts: 618
Location: State College, PA
Well, the NH-U9 kicks the butt of the admittedly smaller Scythe Katana, with a 3,3,2 and 6C smaller heat rise at 12,9,7 and 5V respectively. Shame it's not available for Socket A or it'd be one of the best coolers around for that platform. Guess the weight wouldn't be such a great idea though...

I wonder how well the NH-U9 would fit into the various HTPC cases available as it looks ideal for that application?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 2:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 7:55 am
Posts: 31
Location: Sweden
Well written and informative review as always.

I was wonder if you think it's possible to bend the lowest fins with a pair of pliers so the mosfets get more air? On a 939 board the fan blows to the back exhaust right?

Typo in the table at the price row: "NH-U12: ~€40 (~US$45)" should be "NH-U9: ~€40 (~US$45)" i think.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 10:12 pm
Posts: 274
Location: Sydney, Australia
not a bad little cooler, just a pitty they dont seem very available

_________________
AMD64 3200 w/ Zalman 7700AlCu @ 5v (900rpm)
MSI K8N Neo4 w/ TR HR05-SLI
2048mb Generic DDR400
Sparkle 8800GT w/ AC Accelero S1
SATA Seagate 7200.7 160gb
SATA Samsung HD501LJ 500gb
Corsair VX450w
120mm Aerocool Turbine 2000 @ 9v (800rpm)
80mm Coolermaster @ 5v (1000rpm)
Coolermaster Aerogate3


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 4:23 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2004 6:29 am
Posts: 70
It's just a shame that orientation is limited on the S478 & K8 platforms, unlike the Scythe Ninja. What's impressive is how good the smaller of the 2 varieties performs. I wonder if this might give Scythe the idea of making a smaller version of the Ninja that would fit in a great many more peoples' cases/motherboards.

The concern that there was a lack of cooling for the VRM was mentioned again. But even in a recent review of the AC Freezer 7, which was compared to a XP-120 & Ninja, there wasn't a noticeable difference between the coolers with regards to the VRM. So I think that there is some conflict between SPCR's logical argument versus their own real-world findings. I guess we have to wait patiently for the upcoming article on the subject?

_________________
Rigs have bespoke AcoustiProducts dampening, Nexus fans, and Samsung/WD drives
MCE2005: Accent HT-400 + Asus P5W DH Deluxe + 6600 Core2Duo (XP-120) + 7600GT (Zalman VF900)
GAMES: Antec 3700BQE + Asus P5W DH Deluxe + 6600 Core2Duo (Scythe Ninja) + 7900GTO
NLE: Antec 3700BQE + Abit IC7-G + 3.2 Prescott (Scythe Ninja) + 9800pro (volt mod. artic cooler)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 7:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 7:33 am
Posts: 3
It's not that I’d want to put your results in question, but I’m a little bit surprised that the NH-U12 falls behind the Skythe and the Thermalright so clearly. There’s no doubt that these are excellent coolers, but in most of the other reviews that compare these coolers, the NH-U12 is about on par with the Skythe and beating the Thermalright (e.g.: http://www.teccentral.de/artikel/artike ... -Test.html). In some reviews, the NH-U12 even outperforms the Ninja: http://www.matbe.com/articles/lire/267/ ... page16.php

Well, different platforms yield different results.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 8:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 4:58 pm
Posts: 175
The included CoolLink fans look very much like the Akasa Amber series fans, built by Y.S. Tech.

_________________
No one will believe in your dreams until you invest some money.

ASMET Purdue University
Staff Writer|Techgage.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:47 am 
Offline
SPCR Reviewer

Joined: Sun Sep 21, 2003 11:23 am
Posts: 1845
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
I think what it might come down to is different methodologies.

The reason it does so well in the Matbe article is because they're using dual fans, whereas the Ninja only uses a single fan (at least it's the same fan...)

I don't know enough German to determine what fan was used in the TecCentral article, but it seems that this testing was done in a case, and with their "Quiet" fan at full speed (correct me if I'm wrong). I would speculate that it's their in-system test that changes things.

Also, the way that SPCR tests heatsinks — undervolting fans to find the threshold of acceptable cooling — tends to exaggerate the differences IMO.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 11:08 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jun 18, 2004 6:53 pm
Posts: 1371
kojak71 wrote:
It's just a shame that orientation is limited on the S478 & K8 platforms, unlike the Scythe Ninja. What's impressive is how good the smaller of the 2 varieties performs. I wonder if this might give Scythe the idea of making a smaller version of the Ninja that would fit in a great many more peoples' cases/motherboards.


They already do, although performance is worse. On the bright side Katana is orientation independant on all sockets except Socket A.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 11:36 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2005 6:55 am
Posts: 5085
Location: UK
Quote:
Also, the way that SPCR tests heatsinks — undervolting fans to find the threshold of acceptable cooling — tends to exaggerate the differences IMO.


But is very relevant to the way SPCR readers will use the heatsinks, so fully appropriate for the particular user base. It's horses for courses isn't it. We test them in the conditions that we will likely use them in, they do the same.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 7:33 am
Posts: 3
Devonavar wrote:
I think what it might come down to is different methodologies.

The reason it does so well in the Matbe article is because they're using dual fans, whereas the Ninja only uses a single fan (at least it's the same fan...)

I don't know enough German to determine what fan was used in the TecCentral article, but it seems that this testing was done in a case, and with their "Quiet" fan at full speed (correct me if I'm wrong). I would speculate that it's their in-system test that changes things.

Also, the way that SPCR tests heatsinks — undervolting fans to find the threshold of acceptable cooling — tends to exaggerate the differences IMO.


I don't think different methodologies explain it all. If you look at the Matbe graphs, the NH-U12 is 2,5°C ahead of the Skythe Ninja with both coolers using the very same _one_ Papst fan. The Noctua gains another 0,5° using a second Papst fan.

You're right that TecCentral tested the coolers within a case. They actually didn't use any case fans at all, so this may actually come close to some real world silent rigs. Note that they used an Abit KN8 though, so the Noctua had a big disadvantage compared to the Skythe because the Skythe could blow the hot air out towards the back of the case whereas the NH-U12 had to blow up towards the PSU. You're also right that they used their silent fan (Noiseblocker SX2, 1,52V - which isn't too silent by the way) at full speed. Now I completely agree that undervolting the fan may (depending on how good the coolers tend to perform with low airflow) "exaggerate the differences" as you put it. But I wouldn't agree that this has to be in favour of the Skythe. If you look at the Matbe test for example, at 5V the NH-U12's lead over the Skythe increases to 4,1°C.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 3:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 10:12 pm
Posts: 274
Location: Sydney, Australia
wouldnt it simply be because those other review sites and SPCR used different fans? nexus is a very low CFM fan, and as such shows heatsink performance under minimal airflow conditions
the other sites use higher airflow fans, and as you know, some heatsinks perform alot better with high CFM fans and they perform terrible with low CFM fans. (due to design of the heatsink)
i hope i got across my idea??

_________________
AMD64 3200 w/ Zalman 7700AlCu @ 5v (900rpm)
MSI K8N Neo4 w/ TR HR05-SLI
2048mb Generic DDR400
Sparkle 8800GT w/ AC Accelero S1
SATA Seagate 7200.7 160gb
SATA Samsung HD501LJ 500gb
Corsair VX450w
120mm Aerocool Turbine 2000 @ 9v (800rpm)
80mm Coolermaster @ 5v (1000rpm)
Coolermaster Aerogate3


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 7:33 am
Posts: 3
Yes, I think I understand what you're trying to say, but to be honest, I tend to disagree with you on that point. The NH-U12 is at least said to perform great at "minimal airflow conditions" and actually, that's exactly what SPCR says:

Quote:
So, how good is the big Noctua / Coolink? With the Nexus fan at 9V or above, it gives up 6~7°C to the Ninja, and 3°C to the Thermalright HR-01. This is quite significant. At the low 7V fan speed, however, its performance come much closer, within 2~3°C of either of the established competition.


Now your totally right that at 12V the Papst fan Matbe used has 67 CFM whereas the Nexus fan used by SPCR has only 28 CFM, but both according to the statement quoted above and to the measurements at Matbe (2,5°C lead of the Noctua at 12V vs. 4,1°C at 5V), this should actually turn out in favour of the Noctua. Or am I getting something wrong here?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:53 pm
Posts: 117
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Rory Buszka wrote:
The included CoolLink fans look very much like the Akasa Amber series fans, built by Y.S. Tech.


Coolink fans made by Noiseblocker's oem manufacturer.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 1:13 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 10:12 pm
Posts: 274
Location: Sydney, Australia
hmm, you could be right jackz

_________________
AMD64 3200 w/ Zalman 7700AlCu @ 5v (900rpm)
MSI K8N Neo4 w/ TR HR05-SLI
2048mb Generic DDR400
Sparkle 8800GT w/ AC Accelero S1
SATA Seagate 7200.7 160gb
SATA Samsung HD501LJ 500gb
Corsair VX450w
120mm Aerocool Turbine 2000 @ 9v (800rpm)
80mm Coolermaster @ 5v (1000rpm)
Coolermaster Aerogate3


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 7:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 1:52 am
Posts: 22
One thing I have wondered about these tower coolers with heatpipes:

Don't heatpipes work best with some degree of vertical orientation? If so, then in your typical tower case, Ninja et al aren't going to be as efficient as they could be, since the pipes will run parallel to the floor.

Has anyone tried bending something like the Ninja so that the pipes are at least diagonally oriented? Seems like this would be agood design for the next rendition...

Very TiredOldMan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 11:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2005 11:06 am
Posts: 2049
Location: Klamath Falls, OR
TiredOldMan wrote:
Has anyone tried bending something like the Ninja so that the pipes are at least diagonally oriented? Seems like this would be agood design for the next rendition...

Rather than bend the Ninja, it's simpler to just lay the computer on its side so the Ninja is upright. I haven't done this with my Ninja because I'm just interested in the performance with the case upright, and that's fine.

I did try it once with the XP-90. No difference. There is a small difference with the A-C Freezer 64 but I forget which way is better. :oops:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 11:34 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2002 3:26 pm
Posts: 11805
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Most heatpipes work fine in all configurations except when the evaporator (where the heat evaporates the coolant) is positioned substantially above the condensor (where the coolant becomes a liquid). The heat from the CPU will maintain a steady internal pressure so that the coolant, once condensed into liquid, is forced (usually by capillary action) back to the evaporator, thus keeping the cycle continuous. How effective heatpipes are depends mostly on the effectiveness of heat transfer between the evaporator & the heat source, between the condensor & the air (with aircooled finned heatpipes), and the speed at which the coolant cycles.

Even when the evaporator is above the condensor, if there's enough heat (ie, when the CPU is really under stress and thus running hot), the capillary "return" of the coolant still works, at least to some degree -- it is a closed system in which pressure plays a big part. The coolant will not cycle as quickly, but it will still cycle.

http://www.thermacore.com/hpt_how.htm

Image

http://www.tsheatronics.co.jp/english/technology/

_________________
Mike Chin,
Editor/Publisher, SPCR
Support SPCR with your donations!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 3:36 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 1:52 am
Posts: 22
Hmmm, that is one hell of an interesting system.

It almost seems like some variation of it could eventually be used to generate electricity. I don't know, from liquid moving between a sunlit spot and a shady spot. or, er, something like that...

God, I've got to do something about this tiredness! And this age!

TiredOldMan


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2005 6:55 am
Posts: 5085
Location: UK
Quote:
It almost seems like some variation of it could eventually be used to generate electricity. I don't know, from liquid moving between a sunlit spot and a shady spot. or, er, something like that...


Otherwise known as solar thermal power:

US Department of Energy Solar Program

Concentrated Solar Power


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 4:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 1:52 am
Posts: 22
Well, there is that...

But I was thinking, rather than the "conventional steam generator" that the page talks about, more along the lines of someday capturing the energy of the liquid's motion itself as it travels along the pipe.

Of course, when you harvest the energy, the liquid (or gas) will not move as much, but I wonder: it seems like the process of

1 capturing heat from the sun, 2 transfering it into a liquid 3 using it to heat yet another liquid 4 generating motion in a generator and 5 turning that into electrical energy

might be a little inefficient.

And I just realized that I am in the process of derailing this thread. Sorry. Someday I'll achieve the proper level of restraint to match my lack of knowledge. :roll:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 4:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:12 am
Posts: 545
Location: UK
TiredOldMan wrote:
...capturing the energy of the liquid's motion itself as it travels along the pipe...

What you describe sounds similar to a Stirling engine. Those can indeed be used for generation of electricity from solar.

_________________
https://mrevil.asvachin.eu/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 10:50 am 
Offline
*Lifetime Patron*

Joined: Thu Apr 15, 2004 3:53 am
Posts: 495
Location: In Front of PC
Just dropped by to say: great review!

_________________
160+ CPU Cooler Comparison Database


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 11:08 am 
Offline
Friend of SPCR

Joined: Sun Dec 05, 2004 11:34 pm
Posts: 889
Location: Finland -- Folding For SPCR
Hello,

I checked out the fan when the review came out. I didn't post this as I thought no one was interested:

80mm Coolink/Akasa/Noiseblocker seem to be the one and the same fan and made by YS tech.
120mm Coolink/Akasa/Noiseblocker seem to be the same fan, a wild guess it could be YS tech.

Akasa Amber 80mm and 120mm
http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=a ... m=75&num=1

Akasa Amber / Noiseblocker /YS tech 80mm
Noiseblocker 120mm / Coolink 120mm

http://prohardver.hu/c.php?mod=20&id=665&p=2

_________________
Just because I didn't respond to your post doesn't mean you were right. It just means I was speechless as to how to reply to such an idiotic statement

[MainRig][HTPC][Playground]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 1:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2005 11:06 am
Posts: 2049
Location: Klamath Falls, OR
Aleksi wrote:
80mm Coolink/Akasa/Noiseblocker seem to be the one and the same fan and made by YS tech.
120mm Coolink/Akasa/Noiseblocker seem to be the same fan, a wild guess it could be YS tech.

Shame! They can't possibly be the same fan. They have different color blades! Coolink is green, Akasa is amber, Noiseblocker is in transition but weren't their blades blue until recently? Why, I may go into business marketing a fan whose blades are puce polka-dotted in mauve. :D

My 120mm Akasa Amber fan, bought in the past few weeks, sez AK-183-L2B across the top of the back label and "Y.S. Tech KM 121225LB" across the bottom, so you make very good wild guesses. :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 1:38 pm 
Offline
Friend of SPCR

Joined: Sun Dec 05, 2004 11:34 pm
Posts: 889
Location: Finland -- Folding For SPCR
Felger,

don't you know the magic of relabelling and different coloured blades? :lol: Actually if you look at those fan specs and compare them with each other they don't add up. Now that's a surprise... :roll:

Good to know for sure that the 120mm is also YS tech, thanks.

_________________
Just because I didn't respond to your post doesn't mean you were right. It just means I was speechless as to how to reply to such an idiotic statement

[MainRig][HTPC][Playground]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2006 5:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 20, 2005 6:55 am
Posts: 5085
Location: UK
Quote:
Of course, when you harvest the energy, the liquid (or gas) will not move as much, but I wonder: it seems like the process of

1 capturing heat from the sun, 2 transfering it into a liquid 3 using it to heat yet another liquid 4 generating motion in a generator and 5 turning that into electrical energy

might be a little inefficient.


<Off-topic>

Common sense would dictate that the less transfers there are the more efficient an energy-gathering technology would be; therefore direct sunlight-to-electricity conversion should be the most efficient process (photovoltaic), but it isn't. Most commercial solar panels have efficiencies in the low teens, whereas thermal solar can reach efficiencies as high as 40% already.

</Off-topic>


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 35 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group