Silent PC Review is passionate about ergonomic spaces for people and finding creative, practical solutions to silencing all kinds of IT machines. We provide detailed reviews and ground-breaking knowhow about the acoustics of computers and components, as well as their energy efficiency and thermal performance.

Not just your average "How I built my silent pc" site

Mirar, one of the regular contributors on the Yahoo Groups Silent-PC mailing list, has posted his experiences in building a silent PC. Much of Mirar's work focuses on building a custom case, designed to reduce noise as much as possible. To quote:

I decided to design and build a case that would address this. The needs would be:

  • Silence. It would need to be heavy and dampening enough. A thin metal case is not the way; perhaps with heavy dampening mats.
  • Cold. It would need air ducts wide enough to handle lot of air without turbulence, and lots of spaces for fans.
  • Space. It should be easy to work in; not much screwing and pulling out irrelevant cables to remove a hard disk. Or a PCI card.
  • Simplicity. I should be able to build it. And I'm not /that/ handy with tools.

The result is very effective, if not all that pretty. :) Lots of pictures and explanations -- definitely worth a read.

Sharka Corp. offering Quiet, Build-to-order systems

Sharka Corporation is now offering build-to-order computers. While these computers are simply resold ARM Systems Computers, it's nice to see more retailers taking up the silent PC cause. Additionally, there are some other nice things about the Sharka/ARM line of computers. Read more below.

Zalman announces VIA-specific passive heatsink

Zalman recently announced the CNPS6100-AlCu passive heatsink designed for the VIA C3 processor. This solution is entirely passive and does not include any sort of fan, due to the cool-running of the C3 line of processors.

Explanation of ball vs. sleeve-bearing fans

http://www.silentpcreview.com

Why aren't today's PCs quiet?

Salon ran an article a while back that talked about the increasing noise in computers, as well as why PC manufacturers might be having a hard time making their computers silent. The article gives a nod to the iMac as one of the most silent computers available from a big-name manufacturer and also talks about European regulations hopefully helping to reduce noise in PCs.

Building a Silent Thin Client

Jason Spisak wrote an HOWTO on building a silent thin client[?]. The end result is a great thin client that has no moving parts. Perhaps not a great primary computer, but it's perfect for checking email and surfing the web. Works well with the Linux Terminal Server Project.