Complete|Mobile Systems

AOpen EY855-II Pentium M SFF barebones system

Complete|Mobile Systems
After AOpen introduced the i855GMEm-LFS motherboard, it was only a matter of time before they followed up with a SFF based on the Pentium M. The XC Cube EY855-II has been eagerly awaited by computing enthusiasts hoping for another quiet SFF PC option. If there is a flagship model in AOpen's XC Cube line, the EY855-II is probably it.

Soltek QBIC EQ3901 SFF barebones system

Complete|Mobile Systems
Soltek's Athlon 64-939 SFF system matches offerings from Shuttle and AOpen for style and features. It uses a standard mATX PSU by Seasonic and a standard HSF mounting system, allowing for relatively simple upgrades. The EQ3901's noise performance leaves much to be desired, however.

Shuttle SB86i BTX SFF system

Complete|Mobile Systems
Shuttle's first real BTX SFF system in their first steel chassis continues the somewhat larger trend started with their other socket T models. PCIe VGA, a BTX 80mm fan PSU and an actual Intel BTX HSF rather than the right angle heatpipe HS preferred by Shuttle -- all these make for a ground breaking SFF. Acoustics are still challenged.

Shuttle XPC SB81P: Loaded 775 BTX

Complete|Mobile Systems
It's the first of Shuttle's socket T SFF systems, and it is loaded to the gills with convenience and performance features. It borrows heavily from BTX layout without quite being BTX. Visibly bigger than its predecessors, with a huge (for SFF) 350W PSU, this Prescott-only machine is unfortunately quite a lot noisier. Frankly, we're a bit disappointed.

Shuttle SN95G5: A64-939 SFF

Complete|Mobile Systems
It is not the first AMD Athlon 64 SFF barebones system from Shuttle, but it is the first to use a Socket 939 motherboard. We installed a 3500+ Winchester (90nm) core in a minimalist setup with a notebook HDD, played long in the BIOS and measured, tested and listened to bring you this review of a quiet, powerful system that is almost as small as the Shuttle Zen.

AOpen XC Cube EX915: 775-socket SFF barebones

Complete|Mobile Systems
The EX915 is a 775 or socket T SFF barebones from AOpen, based on the same mechanical platform as the previously reviewed EZ65, but with a more techno sleek facia and the Intel 915 chipset. Socket 775 processors appear to be all Prescott-core right now. The $6 million question: Can a Prescott-CPU SFF system be quiet?

Shuttle XPC ST61G4 SFF barebones PC

Complete|Mobile Systems
The Shuttle XPC Zen made a big splash at SPCR earlier this year as the quietest SFF system we'd reviewed, with an external fanless PSU and no AGP slot. The Shuttle XPC ST61G4 uses a quiet fan-cooled higher power PSU and offers the AGP slot on the same basic ATI9100 chipset board, making it more suitable for power users. How about quiet-loving power users? Check our ST61G4 review to find out.

VoodooPC Rage F-50 PC / Zalman TNN-500A Case

Complete|Mobile Systems
When a gaming computer specialist teams with a quiet component leader, you expect the end result to be... the VoodooPC Rage F-50, which wraps a Zalman Fanless TNN-500A case/psu/cooling system around an Athlon A64, ATI9800XT, RAID drives and gobs of fast RAM. Our review of the F-50 System... and the fanless Zalman TNN-500A: It is impossible to write about the former without also discussing the latter.

Review: Hush ATX PC

Complete|Mobile Systems
Seems like only yesterday that we were oohing and aahing about the Hush Mini-ITX PC but amazingly, that was five months ago. It was around the time that the Hush ATX PC was released: A larger more powerful version of the original, revamped for the much hotter Intel P4 processor. Here is our review of the bigger and faster Hush ATX PC with a P4-2.8.

Mappit A4F: A Truly Silent PC

Complete|Mobile Systems
The Mappit A4F comes so close to the SPCR Holy Grail of a Zero dBA PC that it might as well have reached it. This fanless M-ITX system is not flawless and it can probably be improved on even for acoustics... but there is hardly any point if you can't hear the improvement. I couldn't hear it whan I first turned it on while it was in my lap. It is the quietest computer I have ever used or seen or heard or even heard about.

AOpen XC Cube EZ65: A Quiet, Powerful SFF

Complete|Mobile Systems
A second quiet SFF barebones review in a week, this time from AOpen: The XC Cube EZ65 delivers low noise performance in a spiffy body that contains an Intel 865-based engine with both AGP and PCI ports. It is not just a quiet pretty face, it's a serious performer. Read our review to consider why we think AOpen has succeeded in creating a PC for Everyman with the XC Cube EX65.

Shuttle Zen XPC ST62K: Finally, a Quiet SFF PC!

Complete|Mobile Systems
The Zen XPC ST62K is not only Shuttle's smallest SFF barebones PC, it is also their quietest. They moved the PSU out of the box and replaced it with a fanless brick; they also elminated the AGP port and rely exclusively on the integrated video in the ATI 9100 IGP chipset. Is it really quiet? Yes! Is it powerful enough? Yes. We hope it signals a new era of competition among PC component and system makers for the prize of the quietest. Our comprehensive review covers all the details.

ARM Systems StealthPC P4-3.2 Powerhouse

Complete|Mobile Systems
ARM Systems provides us with a powerhouse "StealthPC" review sample loaded to the gills: A P4-3.2 HT CPU, high bandwidth dual-channel memory sticks, SATA RAID-0, a heatpipe-cooled ATI-9800XT VGA card, the top SB Audigy 2ZS sound card, a sleeper mid-tower case with thermally controlled dual 120mm fans and much more. Is it quiet? Our latest prebuilt system review tells all.

Review: FrontierPC's Silent XP2500+ system

Complete|Mobile Systems
Frontier PC in Vancouver, BC offers up their Silent XP2500+ prebuilt system for SPCR's scrutiny. A value system by one of the few Canadian stores that sells a complete quiet PC, this ones uses the boldly styled Chenbro Xpider case. Check out our review of the Frontier PC Silent XP2500+ system.

Review: Hush Mini-ITX PC

Complete|Mobile Systems
Hush Technologies' sleek and stylish Hush Mini-ITX PC finally gets reviewed at SPCR. It looks for all the world like a cross between a high end stereo amplifier and a high end CD player. It could easily become a fetish if you're so inclined. Our complete review, complete with sound power testing results.
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