You are here

Scythe Big Shuriken 2 & Reeven Vanxie CPU Coolers

Scythe Big Shuriken 2 & Reeven Vanxie CPU Coolers

June 13, 2012 by Lawrence Lee

Product
Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B Reeven Vanxie
Manufacturer
Scythe Reeven
Street Price
US$35 US$35?

For much of the history of desktop computing, a small form factor PC automatically meant noisy operation. Improvements in CPU efficiency have shattered this paradigm. With modern processors using less power and producing less heat, a cramped case with small fans no longer guarantees acoustic doom. The availability of compact but effective aftermarket coolers also helps greatly, particularly for DIYers.

Here are two CPU coolers aimed at smaller systems, though they belong to two distinct classes. The Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B is a follow up to the original Big Shuriken, a popular heatsink capable of running quietly while maintaining decent cooling proficiency, while taking up little space. The Reeven Vanxie, on the other hand, is almost comically petite and has no legacy to live up to. One of the smallest third party heatsinks we've encountered, it's a low profile offering for use in ultra compact cases as an alternative to a loud, inefficient stock cooler.

Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B

For the longest time, Scythe's Big Shuriken was the only widely available, high performance, low profile, CPU cooler for SFF systems. Its excellent acoustics and reasonable cost made it a triple threat. Its successor is an improvement in a variety of ways, still roughly the same price and identical in size.



The Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B box and contents.

The heatsink has undergone a few small physical changes, along with a faster fan and the inclusion of a backplate mounting system. This last change is welcome as we've never been able to mount the first Shuriken on Intel boards without scraping our knuckles whilst tackling the pushpins in the tiny space beneath the main fin stack. Note: The (recently discontinued) vanilla Big Shuriken 2 is identical to the Rev.B except it lacks an LGA2011 mounting option.

Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B: Specifications

(from the product
web page
)
Model name: BIG Shuriken 2 Rev. B
Model number: SCBSK-2100
Compatibility: Intel®:

Socket T / LGA775

Socket LGA1155

Socket LGA1156

Socket LGA1366

Socket LGA2011

AMD®:

Socket AM2

Socket AM2+

Socket AM3

Socket AM3+

Socket FM1

Combined Dimensions: 125 x 135 x 58 mm
Fan compatibility Overall Weight:

410 g
Scope of Delivery Accessory:

Manual, Thermal Grease
Warranty Baseplate-Material:

Nickel-plated copper (more information)
Fan Specifications
Model Name: Slip Stream 120 Slim PWM
Model No.: SY1212SL12H-P
Fan Dimensions: 120x120x12 mm
Fan Speed: 500 (±200 rpm) - 2.000 rpm (±10%) - PWM-controlled
Noise Level: 9.32 – 33.67 dBA
Air Flow: 12.13 - 45.47 CFM = 21 - 78 m³/h
Static Pressure: 0.11 – 1.35 mmH2O / 1.08 - 13.2 Pa
Input Current: 0.19 A
Bearing Type: Sleeve Bearing
Voltage: 12 V

Reeven Vanxie

A mostly unknown name, Reeven hasn't yet established much market penetration, with only a few of their products available at a smattering of retailers outside of Asia. Their focus is on PC cooling, namely heatsinks, fans, and fan controllers.



The Reeven Vanxie box.



Package contents.

The Vanxie is a truly low profile CPU cooler standing just 34 mm tall and weighing a scant 180 grams. Equipped with only two heatpipes and a slim 80 mm fan, it's obviously not in the same league as the Big Shuriken 2, but it fits the bill for the many cases out there with severe CPU heatsink height restrictions. The question is whether it can provide adequate cooling without generating a high level of noise. This is always a challenge for less well-endowed coolers.

Reeven Vanxie: Specifications

(from the product
web page
)
Model Number: RC-0801
Compatibility:

Intel: 775 / 1155 / 1156 / 1366

AMD: AM3 / AM2+ / AM2

Socket AM3+ / FM1 ready

(Up to 95w)

Dimension: W80xH22xD98mm / W3.14xD0.86xH3.85in
Heatsink Material : Aluminum Fins /

6mm Copper Heatpipe x 2 / Copper base
Fan Dimension: 80 x 80 x 10.8mm

3.14 x 3.14 x 0.4in
Fan Speed: 800 ~ 3300RPM (PWM)
Max. Air Flow: 6.0 ~ 24.82CFM
Noise: 8.2 ~ 32.5dBA
Weight: 140g / 0.31lb (Heatsink Only)

PHYSICAL DETAILS: Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B

The Scythe Big Shuriken 2 is composed of 110 aluminum fins (80 in the larger section) friction-fit to five 6 mm thick heatpipes soldered to a nickel-plated copper base. The cooler measures 125 x 38 x 135 mm (W x H x D) and weighs about 410 grams.



Big Shuriken on the left, Big Shuriken 2 on the right.





Original Big Shuriken above, Big Shuriken 2 below. The new version has one extra heatpipe and the secondary heatsink sitting above the base has been removed in favor of a small stack of fins under the heatpipes.



The largest section of the heatsink is composed of 80 fins, 0.29 mm thick and spaced 1.13 mm apart on average.



The heatsink's base is almost completely flat and polished to a mirror shine.



The fan is a 12 mm thick Slip Stream with a slightly higher speed than the original Big Shuriken fan.

BASE & INSTALLATION: Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B

The most critical aspect of installation is that the heatsink be securely
mounted. A firm mating results in good contact between the heatsink's base and
the CPU heatspreader and more efficient heat conduction. Ideally it should
also be a simple procedure with the user having to handle as few pieces of
hardware as possible.



The first step for Intel installation is to identify the correct mounting holes on the mounting clips for the desired socket. Threaded hole insets are then placed inside them and secured with nuts to keep them in place.



The mounting clips are then screwed into the base.



The backplate is screwed into the mounting clips rather than the other way around, forcing users to flip the board upside down. It calls for some dexterity but it's fairly secure, and far better than individual screws without a backplate or the hated plastic pushpins.



Fully installed.



On our Intel DP67BG test motherboard, the heatsink hangs over two of the memory slots, limiting DIMM height to 39 mm.



On LGA1155/1156 mini-ITX boards like the Asus P8H67-I Deluxe pictured above, the heatsink extends over the PCI Express slot, precluding the use of a discrete graphics card.

PHYSICAL DETAILS & INSTALLATION: Reeven Vanxie

The Reeven Vanxie is composed of a copper base soldered to two copper heatpipes surrounded by aluminum fins. Including the fan, it measures 80 x 34 x 98 mm (W x H x D) and weighs approximately 180 grams.



The fins of the heatsink at the center are different from the rest because they are physically bonded directly to the base. In contrast, the tighter pattern fins around the periphery are joined to heatpipes which connect to the base. .



At 38 mm tall, the Vanxie is incredibly short. The fins on the exterior are 0.28 mm thick and spaced 1.39 mm apart, on average.



Its two copper heatpipes and base are nickel-plated, soldered to together to improve conduction.



The base is flat with an almost mirror polished surface. Circular ridges are visible in the right light.



Intel mounting requires the use of metal mounting clips secured to the base. Extensions with holes for the more common sockets (775, 1155/1156, and 1366) are then screwed on (note: they are upside down in the above image). Bolts with rubber washers are inserted on the other side of the motherboard to complete the installation.



It's a very snug fit, with the heatpipe ends almost touching a pair of capacitors.

TESTING

Before thermal testing, we took some basic physical measurements.

Approximate Physical Measurements
Cooler Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B Reeven Vanxie
Weight
330 g

410 g with stock fan and clips
140 g

180 g with stock fan and clips
Height 58 mm 34 mm
Fin count (large/small) 80/30 44/105
Fin thickness
0.29 mm 0.28 mm
Fin spacing
1.13 mm 1.39 mm
Vertical Clearance*
39 mm N/A
* measured from the motherboard PCB to
the bottom fin of the heatsink.


Comparison: Approximate Fin Thickness & Spacing
Heatsink
Fin Thickness
Fin Spacing
Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B
0.29 mm
1.13 mm
Scythe Big Shuriken
0.33 mm
1.19 mm
Reeven Vanxie
0.28 mm
1.39 mm
Noctua NH-L12
0.49 mm
1.51 mm
Scythe Kozuti
0.12 mm
1.69 mm
Scythe Samurai ZZ
0.33 mm
1.74 mm

 

Key Components in LGA1155 Heatsink Test Platform:

  • Intel Core i5-2400 Sandy Bridge core, LGA1155, 3.1 GHz, 45nm, 95W TDP, overclocked/volted to 3.6 GHz and 1.300V.
  • Intel DP67BG ATX motherboard.
    P67 chipset.
  • Kingston
    SSDNow V
    30GB 2.5" solid-state drive. Chosen for silence.
  • OCZ Platinum Extreme Low Voltage DDR3 memory. 2 x 2 GB, DDR3-1333 in dual channel.
  • Seasonic X-400 SS-400FL
    400W ATX power supply. Passively cooled.
  • Arctic Silver
    Lumière
    : Special fast-curing thermal interface material, designed
    specifically for test labs.
  • Noctua 140 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 140x25mm
    fans)
  • Nexus 120 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 120x25mm
    fans)
  • Nexus 92 mm fan (used when possible with heatsinks that fit 92x25mm
    fans)

The systems are silent under test conditions, except for the CPU cooling
fan(s).

Normally, our reference fans are used whenever possible, the measured details
of which are shown below (note these measurements were taken in open air, the
noise levels vary a bit when mounted on heatsinks, especially at higher RPM).

Reference Noctua 140mm fan

Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
Speed
12V
28~29 dBA
1250 RPM
9V
21 dBA
990 RPM
7V
15~16 dBA
770 RPM
6V
13 dBA
660 RPM


Reference Nexus 120mm fan

Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
Speed
12V
16 dBA
1100 RPM
9V
13 dBA
890 RPM
7V
12 dBA
720 RPM


Reference Nexus 92 mm fan

Anechoic chamber measurements
Voltage
Speed
12V
16 dBA
1470 RPM
9V
12 dBA
1150 RPM

Measurement and Analysis Tools

  • Extech 380803 AC power analyzer / data logger for measuring AC system
    power.
  • Custom-built, four-channel variable DC power supply, used to regulate
    the fan speed during the test.
  • PC-based spectrum analyzer:
    SpectraPlus with ACO Pacific mic and M-Audio digital
    audio interfaces.
  • Anechoic chamber
    with ambient level of 11 dBA or lower.
  • Various other tools for testing fans, as documented in our
    latest fan test roundup
    .
  • SpeedFan,
    used to monitor the on-chip thermal sensors. The sensors are not calibrated,
    so results are not universally applicable. The hottest core reading is used.
  • Prime95,
    used to stress the LGA1366 CPU heavily, generating more heat than most real applications.
    8 instances are used to ensure that all 4 cores (with Hyper-threading) are
    stressed.
  • CPU-Z,
    used to monitor the CPU speed to determine when overheating occurs.
  • Thermometers to measure the air temperature around the test platform
    and near the intake of the heatsink fan.

Noise measurements are made with the fans powered from the lab's variable DC
power supply while the rest of the system was off to ensure that system noise
did not skew the measurements.

Load testing was accomplished using Prime95 to stress the processor, and the
graph function in SpeedFan was used to ensure that the load temperature is stable
for at least ten minutes. The temperature recorded is the highest single core
reading. The stock fans were tested at various voltages to represent a good
cross-section of airflow and noise performance.

The ambient conditions during testing were 10~11 dBA and 21~23°C.

Stock Fan Measurements

Specifications: Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B Stock Fan
Manufacturer
Power Rating
4.68 W
Model Number
SY1212SL12H-P
Airflow Rating
45.47 CFM
Bearing Type
Sleeve
Speed Rating
2000 RPM
Corners
Open
Noise Rating
33.67 dBA
Frame Size
120 x 120 x 12 mm
Header Type
4-pin
Fan Blade Diameter
113 mm
Starting Voltage
6.0 V
Hub Size
39 mm
Weight
80 g
Data in green cells provided by the manufacturer
or observed; data in the blue cells were measured.

Like its predecessor, the Big Shuriken 2 uses a slim 120 mm Slip Stream fan, a necessary compromise to keep the cooler's height in check. The Slip Stream series has been a favorite of ours, an old standby that has never disappointed acoustically. This particular model is essentially the same as the original Big Shuriken, only a faster variant with a nominal speed of 2000 rather than 1600 RPM.

Stock Fan Measurements
Voltage
Speed
12V
1960 RPM
30 dBA
9V
1560 RPM
23~24 dBA
8V
1340 RPM
19 dBA
7.5V
1100 RPM
14 dBA
7V
830 RPM
11~12 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
the center of the heatsink.

Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

At maximum speed, the Big Shuriken 2 stock fan produces 30 [email protected] measured on the heatsink, fairly loud by our standards. It's much quieter undervolted, but becomes temperamental below 7V, at which point slight changes in voltage result in a drastic reduction in fan speed; PWM control is preferable. There's also a big drop-off in noise between 8V and 7.5V despite there only being a speed difference of 240 RPM.

At 8V and above, the noise generated is dominated by the turbulence, the soft sound of the air being pushed through the heatsink fins. At 7.5V it develops a bit of a buzzing sound, but it's only audible at close range. At one meter's distance it's almost inaudible at this level, measuring just above our anechoic chamber's noise floor of 10~11 dBA.



The Big Shuriken 2 stock fan at 8V measures 19 [email protected]

At quieter noise levels, our acoustic analysis shows no significant peaks across the majority of the frequency range, indicating a lack of tonality. It has a pleasant, broadband profile.

Specifications: Reeven Vanxie Stock Fan
Manufacturer
Power Rating
2.4 W
Model Number
RY8010S33C-P
Airflow Rating
24.82 CFM
Bearing Type
Sleeve
Speed Rating
3300 RPM
Corners
Closed
Noise Rating
32.5 dBA
Frame Size
80 x 80 x 10 mm
Header Type
4-pin
Fan Blade Diameter
74 mm
Starting Voltage
5.6 V
Hub Size
29 mm
Weight
40 g
Data in green cells provided by the manufacturer
or observed; data in the blue cells were measured.

The Reeven Vanxie is also equipped with a low profile fan, an 80 mm sleeve bearing model that's only 10 mm thick. Given the size of the heatsink, Reeven opted for a high speed model running at 3300 RPM.

Stock Fan Measurements
Voltage
Speed
12V
3290 RPM
33 dBA
9V
2590 RPM
25 dBA
8V
2100 RPM
19 dBA
7V
1680 RPM
14 dBA
6.5V
1150 RPM
12 dBA
Measuring mic positioned 1m at diagonal angle from
the center of the heatsink.

Ambient noise level: 10~11 dBA.

The Vanxie's stock fan is quite loud, measuring 33 [email protected] at full speed. Its noise is comprised mostly of turbulence at 9V~12V but there is a slight, underlying whine that becomes more noticeable as the fan speed is decreased. The fan doesn't start to become quiet until the 8V level and comes close to being inaudible at 6.5V.



At 8V, the Vanxie stock fan generates 19 [email protected] The spectrum shows a few more tonal spikes than the Scythe fan above.

The fan's acoustics aren't great, but certainly better than what one would expect from a stock fan from a lesser known manufacturer. It does sound a bit rougher than the Big Shuriken 2's fan when set to produce similar noise levels.

TEST RESULTS

Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B
Fan Voltage
Fan Speed
°C Rise above Ambient
CPU
VRM
RAM
Stock Fan
12V
1960 RPM
30 dBA
34
22
13
9V
1560 RPM
23~24 dBA
37
26
16
8V
1340 RPM
19 dBA
39
29
20
7.5V
1100 RPM
14 dBA
43
34
24
7V
830 RPM
11~12 dBA
48
39
28
Ref. Nexus 120mm Fan
12V
1080 RPM
14~15
36
27
16
9V
860 RPM
11~12
39
31
21

The new Big Shuriken's cooling proficiency is excellent, particularly at low noise levels. With the original Big Shuriken, a huge 15°C drop-off in performance was experienced going from 1100 to 800 RPM, but the difference was only 5°C for the revised model. The heatsink's capabilities improved even further when paired with our reference Nexus 120 mm, but it was hardly a fair fight; a standard 120 mm fans like the Nexus is twice as thick, increasing the total height of the cooler to 71 mm.

Reeven Vanxie (Stock Fan)
Fan Voltage
Fan Speed
°C Rise above Ambient
CPU
VRM
RAM
12V
3290 RPM
33 dBA
51
28
22
9V
2590 RPM
25 dBA
59
38
28
8V
2100 RPM
19 dBA
66
45
32
7V
1680 RPM
14 dBA
77
56
37
6.5V
1150 RPM
12 dBA
FAIL

Hardly surprising, the diminutive Vanxie performed 20~30°C worse than the Big Shuriken at comparable noise levels. Even at maximum fan speed, it couldn't keep up with the Big Shuriken at its lowest tested fan speed. It couldn't keep the CPU properly cool at ultra low noise levels either, approaching the chip's throttling temperature (~98°C) at 7V / 14 [email protected] and exceeding it at 6.5V / 12 dBA.

Heatsink Comparison Tables

°C rise Comparison (CPU Temperature)
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
Noctua NH-L12

(both fans)
33
-
-
34
-
35
-
36
Noctua NH-L12

(ref. 120mm fan)
-
-
-
-
-
34
-
37
Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B

(ref. 120mm fan)
-
-
-
-
-
36
-
39
Noctua NH-L12

(120mm fan)
-
-
37
-
-
38
-
39
42
Scythe Big Shuriken

(ref. 120mm fan)
-
-
-
-
-
41
-
43
Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B
-
39
-
-
-
43
-
48
Scythe Samurai ZZ

(ref. 92mm fan)
-
-
-
-
-
-
44
-
51
Scythe Samurai ZZ
-
-
45
-
-
46
-
52
Noctua NH-L12

(92mm fan)
42
-
44
-
47
-
51
57
Scythe Big Shuriken
43
-
-
-
-
46
-
61
Scythe Kozuti
-
-
57
-
-
62
-
65
Reeven Vanxie
-
66
-
-
-
-
77
-
F

Thanks to improved low airflow performance, the new Shuriken surpasses the original by a comfortable margin in our performance chart, even beating out the much larger Samurai ZZ. Equipped with our reference Nexus 120 mm fan, it is almost on par with the Noctua NH-L12. A standard sized fan increases the height of the Shuriken to 71 mm though, 5 mm taller than the NH-L12 when the Noctua is configured to use one fan in the bottom position blowing downward.

Though similar in size, the Reeven Vanxie can't touch the Scythe Kozuti, trailing by double digits at similar noise levels. It's also the first cooler we've tested on our new small CPU heatsink test platform that couldn't keep the processor from throttling while producing 12 [email protected] An overclocked 95W quad core Sandy Bridge is a bit much for the Vanxie's capabilities.

°C rise Comparison (VRM Temperature)
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
Noctua NH-L12

(both fans)
17
-
-
19
-
21
-
23
Noctua NH-L12

(ref. 120mm fan)
-
-
-
-
-
20
-
25
Scythe Big Shuriken

(ref. 120mm fan)
-
-
-
-
-
25
-
29
Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B

(ref. 120mm fan)
-
-
-
-
-
27
-
31
Noctua NH-L12

(120mm fan)
-
-
24
-
-
26
-
27
32
Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B
-
29
-
-
-
34
-
39
Noctua NH-L12

(92mm fan)
28
-
31
-
33
-
38
43
Scythe Samurai ZZ

(ref. 92mm fan)
-
-
-
-
-
-
36
-
43
Scythe Big Shuriken
28
-
-
-
-
30
-
47
Scythe Kozuti
-
-
36
-
-
40
-
45
Scythe Samurai ZZ
-
-
38
-
-
39
-
47
Reeven Vanxie
-
45
-
-
-
-
56
-
F

VRM cooling is also much better on the Big Shuriken 2 Rev. B than the original, but only when comparing the stock fans. The first Big Shuriken actually performed a bit better when both heatsinks were paired with our reference fan. The Vanxie came in last as one would expect.

MP3 SOUND RECORDINGS

These recordings were made with a high
resolution, lab quality, digital recording system
inside SPCR's
own 11 dBA ambient anechoic chamber
, then converted to LAME 128kbps
encoded MP3s. We've listened long and hard to ensure there is no audible degradation
from the original WAV files to these MP3s. They represent a quick snapshot of
what we heard during the review.

These recordings are intended to give you an idea of how the product sounds
in actual use — one meter is a reasonable typical distance between a computer
or computer component and your ear. The recording contains stretches of ambient
noise that you can use to judge the relative loudness of the subject. Be aware
that very quiet subjects may not be audible — if we couldn't hear it from
one meter, chances are we couldn't record it either!

The recording starts with 5~10 second segments of room ambiance, then the fan
at various levels. For the most realistic results, set the volume so that
the starting ambient level is just barely audible, then don't change the volume
setting again.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B

At first glance, the Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B seems like only a minor update, having only slight design changes aside from the extra heatpipe, a faster fan, and a new mounting system. We were pleasantly surprised to find a substantial performance difference, particularly at very low fan speeds. When generating a noise level just above our anechoic chamber's noise floor, it spanked the original Big Shuriken by double digits, while at more reasonable fan speeds it generated a 3~4°C reduction. We suspect the new, more secure mounting system is responsible for much of the improvement but it would've been our favorite change regardless. We're not fond of having to flip the motherboard upside-down, but it's still still vastly superior to what preceded it; the pushpins of the original Shuriken are terribly difficult to engage and we're glad to be rid of them.

The Noctua NH-L12 remains the undisputed champion but the Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B is a close second when using the same reference fan. With their respective 120 mm stock fans, the Big Shuriken isn't nearly as good, but it still delivers better bang-for-your-buck. Priced at around US$35, the improved performance comes at no extra cost compared to the original and it's US$20 cheaper than the NH-L12. Though they have similar footprints, the Big Shuriken 2 is also 58 mm tall, 8 mm shorter. We also think the Shuriken's fan has a more pleasant sound with less bearing noise than the NH-L12's 120 mm model.

Our only real complaint about the product is endemic for all top-down heatsinks with 120 mm fans — they are too big to use in SFF gaming systems with mini-ITX LGA1155/1156 boards, hanging over the PCI-E slot, preventing the use of discrete graphics cards. This is unfortunate as this type of PC is most in need of a compact high performance CPU cooler.

Reeven Vanxie

The Reeven Vanxie is seriously outclassed by every aftermarket cooler we've tested thus far. With its 34 mm height and basic design, it's really only a match for a stock cooling unit, though it does sound significantly better than a typical OEM heatsink. The Vanxie performed well enough to keep our overclocked quad core Sandy Bridge chip from throttling, at least until the fan speed was lowered below ~1200 RPM and its noise output approached inaudible levels. We suppose that's an accomplishment for this waif of a heatsink, but it's better suited for dissipating the heat generated by a cooler processor; the good thing is that there are many 65W and 35W TDP processor options today, and these are often used on SFF systems.

We can only recommend the Vanxie under one condition, when the enclosure is so small that a Scythe Kozuti cannot be accommodated. The Kozuti is 6 mm taller but its cooling proficiency is superior by a huge margin and it can be purchased today from stores across the globe. A brief internet search reveals the Vanxie currently being sold only in Japan with the lowest price being ~¥2700 (US$34) while the Kozuti can be found various Japanese retailers for ~¥2400 (US$30). This seems to indicate that if/when the Vanxie reaches other markets, it will also be slightly more expensive, putting it at a further disadvantage.

Our thanks to Scythe and Reeven for the Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B and Vanxie CPU cooler samples.

* * *



Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev.B
wins the SPCR Editor's Choice

SPCR Articles of Related Interest:

Fans from Noctua & Corsair at Computex 2012
SPCR's Updated 2012 Small CPU Heatsink Test Platform
Fan
Roundup #6: Scythe, Noiseblocker, Antec, Nexus, Thermalright

Noctua
NH-L12 Low Profile Cooler

Antec Kühler H20 620 & 920 CPU Water Cooling Units
Scythe
Kozuti Low Profile CPU Heatsink

* * *

Discuss
this article in the SPCR forums.

Sections: 

Google

www SPCR