You are here

AMD's 785G Chipset Boards: 780G Evolved

Asus M4A785TD-V EVO vs. MSI 785GM-E65

August 10, 2009 by Lawrence Lee

Product
Asus M4A785TD-V EVO

AMD AM3 ATX Motherboard
MSI 785GM-E65

AMD AM3 mATX Motherboard
Manufacturer
ASUSTeK Micro-Star
International
Street Price
US$100~$110 US$90

AMD's 785G chipset is the successor to 780G, possibly the most important integrated
graphics chipset in their history. The accompanying HD 3200 graphics chip was
the first onboard solution to support hardware acceleration for modern high-definition
video codecs and its 3D performance was far superior to anything that preceded
it. With the release of 780G, motherboards with integrated graphics were no
longer just cheap entry level products. The 780G chipset aged gracefully and now
is the defacto choice for value — 780G boards are heavy
on features and light on price compared to the competition — especially
Intel.



Package contents.

785G is an evolution of 780G, bringing minor improvements and support for the
AM3 socket with DDR3 memory. The onboard graphics chip, dubbed HD 4200, has
a few advantages over HD 3200 including support for DirectX 10.1 and HDMI 1.3
(but not multi-channel LPCM) and allows for the use of Sideport memory, which
provides a nice performance boost on the more expensive 790GX-based
boards. 3D performance should be similar though, as the number of stream processors
and the core frequency has not changed. The UVD (Unified Video Decoder) has
also been updated to version 2.0, allowing for decoding of multiple streams
(i.e. for picture-in-picture functionality while playing Blu-ray) and some extra
post-processing effects.

The Asus and MSI boards we are looking at today use the 785G chipset paired
with the new SB710 Southbridge chip. 785G bridges the gap between 780G and 790GX,
and SB710 is similar, a hybrid that takes the limited RAID support of SB700
(0, 1, 10, JBOD) and combines it with SB750's ACC (Advanced Clock Calibration)
feature, which aids in overclocking. The vast majority of 780G boards are paired
with SB700 to the dismay of some enthusiasts.



The box of the Asus M4A785TD-V EVO, an ATX 785G motherboard.




The box of the MSI 785GM-E65, a mATX 785G motherboard.

On paper, the two boards share almost the exact same feature set, with the
main differences being the number of expansion slots provided, a result of each
board's respective form factor.

Specifications: Asus
M4A785TD-V EVO
vs.
MSI
785GM-E65


(from their respective product web pages)
Board
Asus M4A785TD-V EVO
MSI 785GM-E65
Chipset
AMD 785G/SB710
AMD 785G/SB710
Sideport Memory
Yes
Yes
CrossFire
Hybrid CrossFireX
Hybrid CrossFire
Memory
DDR3 800/1066/1333

DDR3 1600/1800 (O.C.)
DDR3 800/1066/1333
DIMM Slots
4 (16GB Max)
4 (16GB Max)
PCIe 2.0 x16
2 (16x/4x)
1
PCIe 1x
1
1
PCI
3
2
IDE
1
1
SATA
5
5
eSATA
1
1
RAID
0, 1, 10, JBOD
0, 1, 10, JBOD
VGA
VGA, DVI, HDMI
VGA, DVI, HDMI
Audio
8-channel High Definition, S/PDIF (optical)
8-channel High Definition, S/PDIF (optical)
LAN
Gigabit
Gigabit
FireWire
1 rear port, 1 internal
1 rear port, 1 internal
USB
6 rear ports, 6 internal
6 rear ports, 6 internal
Fan Headers
3
2
Form Factor
ATX
mATX

PHYSICAL DETAILS - ASUS M4A785TD-V EVO



Package contents.




The M4A785TD-V has a light blue color scheme not normally found on Asus
boards. The layout is fairly solid though we prefer the IDE port to be
parallel to the side edge, or better yet, on its side completely. There
are two PCI-E 16x slots for CrossFire configurations.





The oddly shaped heatsinks combined with the powder blue connectors/slots
gives the M4A785TD-V a slightly garish appearance. The heatsinks on the
Northbridge and VRMs are fairly large though, and all the capacitors are
solid-state. No matter how it looks, this board seems to be built to last.





The Northbridge heatsink is particularly interesting with fins splitting
out in various directions. We're not sure if the blue piece on top is
simply welded to the rest of the structure or whether it is simply painted
a different color.




The M4A785TD-V's back panel is stocked with an impressive array of ports:
eSATA, FireWire, HDMI, DVI, and S/PDIF.




CPU, heatsink and memory installed.

BIOS - ASUS M4A785TD-V EVO



"Jumperfree" menu with maximum values entered.




"Jumperfree" menu, continued.





"Hardware Monitor."


BIOS Summary: Asus M4A785TD-V EVO
Setting
Options
CPU Frequency
200 MHz to 550 MHz
CPU Voltage 1.02500V (-0.3000V) to 1.70000V
in 0.00625V increments
Memory Frequency
400MHz, 533MHz, 667MHz, 800MHz
Memory Timing Control
Intermediate
Memory Voltage
1.5000V to to 2.31000V in 0.015V increments
VDDNB Voltage
0.90000V to 1.55000V in 0.00625V increments
CPU VDDA Voltage
2.50V, 2.60V, 2.70V, 2.80V
HT Voltage
1.20000V to 1.35000V in 0.015V increments
Chipset Voltage
1.10000V to 1.61000V in 0.015V increments
Integrated Graphics
IGP Clock
100 to 1500 MHz (500 MHz default)
Memory Options UMA, Sideport, UMA+Sideport
UMA Frame Buffer
32MB, 64MB, 128MB, 256MB, 512MB
SidePort Clock Speed 1333 MHz, 1400 MHz to 2000 MHz in 30 MHz
increments
Side Port Voltage 1.50V, 1.60V, 1.70V
Fan Control
Fan Auto Mode Start Voltage 4.0V, 4.5V, 5.0V, 5.5V, 6.0V
Fan Auto Mode Start Speed Temp 25°C to 48°C
Fan Auto Mode Full Speed Temp
51°C to 75°C

The BIOS allows for plenty of voltage and frequency modification
to satisfy overclockers, and even includes the ability to increase Sideport
memory voltage. Those looking to squeeze better energy efficiency and lower
temperatures out of their CPUs will be somewhat disappointed as the minimum
CPU voltage is -0.30V (1.025V in the case of our X3 720 processor). The fan
control options allow you to set the CPU fan's starting voltage, and the temperature
range. There are no settings for the other two fan headers.

Editor's Note: The MSI board came from AMD with a BIOS version assured to be the latest and greatest. The Asus board, on the other hand, came from Asus, with a BIOS dated some 3 weeks earlier than the version AMD was offering for the board on its media FTP site. The more recent BIOS version at AMD was not recognized by our board to be compatible with it, and there were no other BIOS options on the Asus web sites.

PHYSICAL DETAILS - MSI 785GM-E65



Package contents.




The board's layout is fairly good with all major connectors on the edges
of the PCB. The CPU socket is a little close to the DIMM slots though,
so using memory with tall heatsinks in conjunction with large third
party heatsinks may be an issue. The SATA ports sit on their sides making
for better cabling.




The board's capacitors are all solid-state.




Sitting atop the Northbridge is a modestly-sized chunk of aluminum with
short, broad fins. It is connected via heatpipe to a more fanciful VRM
heatsink.




The 785GM-E65's back panel has the same ports as the M4A785TD-V.





CPU, heatsink and memory installed.

BIOS - MSI 785GM-E65


"Cell Menu" with maximum values entered.




MSI's "Cell Menu," continued.




"H/W Monitor."


BIOS Summary: MSI 785GM-E65
Setting
Options
CPU Frequency
200 MHz to 600 MHz
CPU Voltage 0.800V to 1.5500V in varying increments
FSB/DRAM Ratio
1:2, 1:2.66, 1:3.33, 1:4
Memory Timing Control
Advanced
Memory Voltage
1.50V to 2.42V in varying increments
CPU-Northbridge Voltage
1.202V to 1.207V in 0.0025V increments,
1.240V to 1.870V in 0.02V increments
Northbridge Voltage
1.108V to 1.337V in 0.0225V increments
HT Link Voltage
1.202V to 1.454V in 0.025V increments
Southbridge Voltage
1.228V to 1.472V in 0.024V increments
Integrated Graphics
IGP Clock
150 MHz to 999 MHz (500 MHz default)
Memory Options UMA, Sideport, UMA+SidePort
UMA Frame Buffer
32MB, 64MB, 128MB, 256MB, 512MB
SidePort Clock Speed 1066 MHz, 1333 MHz, 1600 MHz, 1700 MHz
Side Port Voltage N/A
Fan Control
CPU Smart Fan Target Disabled 40, 45, 50, 55, 60
CPU Min. Fan Speed (%) 0, 12.5, 25, 37.5, 50, 62.5, 75, 87.5
SYS FAN 1 Control
50%, 75%, 100%

The BIOS allows for plenty of voltage and frequency modification
to satisfy overclockers. Undervolting is also given almost free reign with
a minimum CPU voltage of 0.800V. The fan control options are a bit limited
as the secondary SYSFAN header has only a single static speed setting.

TEST METHODOLOGY

Test Setup:



Asus M4A785TD-V EVO device listing.




MSI 785GM-E65 device listing.

Measurement and Analysis Tools

  • CPU-Z
    to monitor CPU frequency and voltage.
  • CPUBurn
    K7

    processor stress software.
  • Prime95
    processor stress software.
  • FurMark
    stability test to stress the integrated GPU.
  • Cyberlink
    PowerDVD
    to play video.
  • SpeedFan
    to monitor temperature and fan speeds.
  • Seasonic
    Power Angel
    AC power meter, used to measure the power consumption
    of the system.
  • Custom-built, four-channel variable DC power supply, used to regulate
    the CPU fan speed.

Our main test procedure is designed to determine the overall system power consumption
at various states (measured using a Seasonic Power Angel). To stress CPUs we
use either Prime95 (large FFTs setting) or CPUBurn K7 depending on which produces
higher system power consumption. To stress the IGP, we use FurMark, an OpenGL
benchmarking and stability testing utility. Power consumption during playback
of high definition video is also recorded.

Our main video test suite features a variety of 1080p H.264/VC-1 encoded clips.
The clips are played with PowerDVD and a CPU usage graph is created by the Windows
Task Manger for analysis to determine the approximate mean CPU usage. High CPU
usage is indicative of poor video decoding ability on the part of the integrated
graphics subsystem. If the video (and/or audio) skips or freezes, we conclude
the board's IGP (in conjunction with the processor) is inadequate to decompress
the clip properly.

Cool'n'Quiet was enabled (unless otherwise noted). The following features/services
were disabled during testing to prevent spikes in CPU/HDD usage that are typical
of fresh Vista installations:

  • Windows Sidebar
  • Indexing
  • Superfetch

Video Test Suite



1080p | 24fps | ~10mbps
H.264:
Rush Hour 3 Trailer 1
is a H.264 encoded clip inside an Apple
Quicktime container.





1080p | 24fps | ~8mbps
WMV-HD:
Coral Reef Adventure Trailer
is encoded in VC-1 using the
WMV3 codec commonly recognized by the "WMV-HD" moniker.





1080p | 24fps | ~19mbps
VC-1: Drag Race is a recording of a scene from
network television re-encoded with TMPGEnc using the WVC1 codec, a
more demanding VC-1 codec.




1080p | 24fps | ~33mbps
Blu-ray: Disturbia is a short section (chapter
4) of the Blu-ray version of Disturbia, the motion picture, played
directly off the Blu-ray disc. It is encoded with H.264/AVC.

TEST RESULTS

Asus M4A785TD-V EVO

Test Results: Asus M4A785TD-V EVO
Test State
X3 720 BE @

2.8 GHz (C&Q)
X3 720 BE @

1.6 GHz (1.025V)
Mean

CPU
System Power
Mean

CPU
System Power
Idle
N/A
56W
N/A
59W
Rush Hour

(H.264)
10%
~62W
5%
~64W
Coral Reef

(WMV-HD)
30%
~73W
37%
~65W
Drag Race

(VC-1)
40%
~89W
44%
~67W
Disturbia

(Blu-ray H.264)
15%
~71W
9%
~69W
CPU Load
N/A
123W
N/A
74W
CPU + GPU

Load
N/A
133W
N/A
84W

The M4A785TD-V, powered by a X3 720 processor was tested at stock speeds and
underclocked to 1.6 GHz with the lowest stable voltage possible (in our case,
1.025V — the BIOS limit). Running at 2.8 GHz, the onboard IGP breezed through
our video playback suite with CPU usage topping out at 40% during our high bitrate
VC-1 clip. Underclocked, VC-1 playback used a few more CPU cycles but the clips
were still rendered with relative ease. H.264 playback when underclocked resulted
in lower CPU usage because we disabled Cool'n'Quiet — at stock settings Cool'n'Quiet
set the clock speed lower than 1.6 GHz.

MSI 785GM-E65

Test Results: MSI 785GM-E65
Test State
X3 720 BE @

2.8 GHz (C&Q)
X3 720 BE @

1.6 GHz (0.940V)
Mean

CPU
System Power
Mean

CPU
System Power
Idle
N/A
44W
N/A
45W
Rush Hour

(H.264)
9%
~52W
4%
~52W
Coral Reef

(WMV-HD)
28%
~68W
35%
~55W
Drag Race

(VC-1)
40%
~78W
44%
~56W
Disturbia

(Blu-ray H.264)
16%
~57W
9%
~57W
CPU Load
N/A
121W
N/A
62W
CPU + GPU

Load
N/A
130W
N/A
72W

With the same hardware underneath the hood, the 785GM-E65 delivered nearly
identical results during video playback. The MSI board however exhibited much
lower power consumption, especially when idle. It also used less power when
underclocked/undervolted, though MSI's BIOS allowed us to undervolt further,
0.940V compared to 1.025V on the Asus board.

Comparisons (Stock Speeds)

Comparison (X3 720 @ 2.8 GHz, C&Q)
Test State
M4A785TD-V
M4A78T-E
785GM-E65
Idle
N/A
56W
N/A
54W
N/A
44W
Rush Hour

(H.264)
10%
~62W
7%
~57W
9%
~52W
Coral Reef

(WMV-HD)
30%
~73W
21%
~64W
28%
~68W
Drag Race

(VC-1)
40%
~89W
35%
~71W
40%
~78W
Disturbia

(Blu-ray H.264)
15%
~71W
20%
~70W
16%
~57W
CPU Load
N/A
123W
N/A
117W
N/A
121W
CPU + GPU

Load
N/A
133W
N/A
135W
N/A
130W

The 790GX-based Asus M4A78T-E had slightly lower CPU usage than the 785G boards
during our WMV-HD clip, though 7-9% isn't enough of a difference to consider
the result anything but an anomaly. We weren't able to detect any difference
between the HD 3300 and HD 4200 graphics in regards to video playback.

The M4A785TD-V is the least energy efficient AM3 board we've tested, using
12W more idle, 5-14W more during video playback, and a 2-3W more during full
load compared to its MSI counterpart. The M4A78T-E fared poorly in idle power
like the M4A785TD-V, but used 4-6W less than the 785G boards during CPU load
only. Most of the other results fell in-between.

The 785GM-E65 uses a 4+1 phase array in its VRMs, while the M4A785TD-V has
a 8+2 phase design. That would seem to indicate that the MSI board is more suited
for low-load systems while the Asus is more efficient when paired with a higher
power CPU, though this was not the case when we pushed our 95W X3 720 to the
brink on both boards. The 785GM-E65 also has "active phase switching"
which adjusts the phases used by the board's VRMs depending on CPU load. The
M4A785TD-V, like most Asus boards has a similar feature called EPU though all
it seems to do is make minor adjustments to various operating voltages which
results in only slight energy savings.

Comparison (Underclocked, Undervolted)

Comparison (X3 720 @ 1.6GHz, best undervolt)
Test State
M4A785TD-V (1.025V)
M4A78T-E (0.9125V)
785GM-E65 (0.940V)
Idle
N/A
59W
N/A
50W
N/A
45W
Rush Hour

(H.264)
5%
~64W
3%
~56W
4%
~52W
Coral Reef

(WMV-HD)
37%
~65W
22%
~56W
35%
~55W
Drag Race

(VC-1)
44%
~67W
40%
~58W
44%
~56W
Disturbia

(Blu-ray H.264)
9%
~69W
23%
~61W
9%
~57W
CPU Load
N/A
74W
N/A
63W
N/A
62W
CPU + GPU

Load
N/A
84W
N/A
82W
N/A
72W

The M4A785TD-V used the most power when undervolted to the lowest stable voltage
with our processor running at 1.6 GHz, though it we weren't able to lower it
below 1.025V due to the BIOS. In any regard, it drew 14W more when idle and
10-12W more during video playback and CPU/GPU load compared to the MSI 785GM-E65.
The 790GX-based M4A78T-E used only slightly more than the MSI board, 5W at most
during most of our test states, but during full system load, it used 10W more,
2W less than the M4A785TD-V.

Fan Control

To test the board's fan control, we connected the CPU fan to a manual fan speed
controller so we could slow it down to induce higher CPU temperatures during
load. A 92mm Scythe Kama PWM (2500 RPM) fan was connected to the CPU fan header
and a 80mm Scythe Kama Flow (1500 RPM) fan was connected to the System fan header.

Fan Control
Asus M4A785TD-V EVO
Criterion
CPU Fan

(2500 RPM)
System Fan

(1500 RPM)
Min. Fan Speed
1220 RPM
720 RPM
Trigger Temp.
30°C
N/A (constant)
Max. Fan Speed Temp.
51°C
N/A (constant)
BIOS settings: 4.0V starting voltage, 30°C trigger
temp., 51°C full speed temp.
MSI 785GM-E65
Criterion
CPU Fan

(2500 RPM)
System Fan

(1500 RPM)
Min. Fan Speed
200 RPM
630 RPM
Trigger Temp.
42°C
N/A (constant)
Max. Fan Speed Temp.
48°C
N/A (constant)
BIOS settings: 45°C trigger temp, 12.5% CPU min.
fan speed, 50% SYS fan speed.

The Asus M4A785TD-V's fan control followed precisely the settings we entered
in the BIOS. The fan ramp up was gradual, starting at 1220 RPM at 30°C core
temperature and topping out at just over 2500 RPM at 51°C. By tweaking these
settings you can make the fan control as aggressive or as passive as you like.
On the downside, the CPU fan's minimum speed is a bit too high, and the secondary
fan spun 50% speed throughout, not reacting to changes in temperature.

The MSI board had a much lower minimum CPU fan speed — it spun at only 200
RPM until the core temperature reached 42°C (3°C lower than the value
entered in the BIOS), and ramped up very quickly, reaching its maximum speed
a mere 6°C later. You can select when the CPU fan cranks up, but you can't
dictate the speed at which it does so. The secondary fan spun at 630 RPM when
set to 50% in the BIOS (75% and 100% are the other options). Like the Asus board,
it does not respond to increased heat.

SpeedFan Support

For Windows users, SpeedFan is our application of choice for fan control. It
can be configured to raise or lower multiple fan speeds to designated limits
when any specified temperature threshold is breached.



SpeedFan correlations: Asus M4A785TD-V EVO.

SpeedFan reported fan speeds from all three headers as well as the "CPU"
and "MB" temperatures indicated in Asus' PC Probe utility. SpeedFan
can control the CPU_FAN header (only if a PWM fan is connected) and the CHA_FAN
header. To enable fan control, select the "IT8712F-J" chip in the
Advanced tab of the Configuration menu and set all the PWM modes to "Software
Controlled."



SpeedFan main screen: MSI 785GM-E65.

Unfortunately SpeedFan does not yet support the sensors on the MSI 785GM-E65
— it could only report the hard drive and CPU core temperatures. SpeedFan
also does not support fan speed readings or fan control of any kind. To make
matters worse, the system monitoring and tweaking utilities offered on the support
CD would not install.

Cooling

Lower cost boards ship with simple heatsinks on the Northbridge and Southbridge
while those targeted at enthusiasts typically have large heatpipe coolers and
heatsinks on the voltage regulation modules near the CPU socket. A well-cooled
motherboard can deliver better power efficiency and stability.

Heatsink Temperatures
Heatsink
Southbridge
Northbridge
VRM
MSI 785GM-E65
50°C
64°C
61°C
Asus M4A785TD-V
57°C
70°C
61°C
Asus M4A78T-E
50°C
85°C
63°C
DFI 790GX-M3H5
60°C
86°C
80°C
Measured with a spot thermometer at the hottest point
of each heatsink after 15 minutes of full CPU + GPU load.

CPU fan reduced to 8V.

The MSI 785GM-E65 was easily the winner in our thermal testing. Its chipsets
measured 6-7°C than Asus' board which makes sense considering the board's
lower power consumption. The heatsinks on both boards were fairly cool by relative
standards. Cooling isn't an issue on either.

3D Performance

To get a rough estimate of how well each board's integrated graphics plays
games, we ran 3DMark05/06. As synthetic benchmarks they have limited value,
but they give a rough idea of how well an IGP performs.

3D Performance: Futuremark Comparison
Motherboard
Graphics
3DMark05
3DMark06
Asus M4A78T-E
HD 3300
4884
2205
Asus M3A78-T (AM2+)
HD 3300
4699
2140
Asus M4A785TD-V
HD 4200
4095
1789
MSI 785GM-E65
HD 4200
4067
1765
256MB of VRAM assigned to IGP

(128MB Sideport + 128MB UMA).

The HD 3300 IGP on the 790GX chipset is still a faster chip, posting a 17%
and 22% advantage in 3DMark05/06 respectively over HD 4200. Taking into account
our previous results with the 780G chipset and X2 4850e processor, after extrapolation/scaling,
we estimate HD 4200 has cut the difference in half, sitting right between HD
3200 and HD 3300.

FINAL THOUGHTS

The 785G chipset is an evolutionary step, bringing a few feature
improvements over 780G. It provides a capable and affordable alternative
to 790GX for users looking to setup a true AM3 system, DDR3 memory and all.
790 boards offer faster 3D performance (in the order of 20% if you consider
3DMark a good indicator), more bandwidth for CrossFire configurations (8x/8x
vs. 16x/4x) and RAID-5 capability from the SB750 Southbridge chip. If none of
these advantages appeal to you, a 785G board might be superior as HD
4200 includes an updated version of UVD, and it is more affordable.

The MSI 785GM-E65's main draw is its impressive energy efficiency. At idle
it used 12W (about 20%) less than the Asus board, and was thrifty during video
playback as well. The heatsinks on the board components run fairly cool, a result
of its high efficiency. The BIOS has plenty of voltage/frequency options and
allowed us to undervolt much more than the M4A785TD-V. The only aspect of the
785GM-E65 we disliked was the fan control system. Once the target temperature
is reached, the fan ramps up incredibly fast and the system fan can only be
set to three different but static speeds. It is not yet supported by SpeedFan.

The Asus M4A785TD-V EVO offers more expansion slots
and the option of using CrossFire. Our sample's power consumption is decidedly
poor at low levels, though it matches the 785GM-E65's efficiency at
full load. Like the MSI board, its components are well-cooled and shouldn't
be problem if paired with a high performance 125W+ processor, for which it seems
more suited. The BIOS is enthusiast-oriented but has an CPU undervolting limit
of -0.3V. Fan control was better than on the 785GM-E65. The settings in the
BIOS allow you to adjust its aggressiveness to suite your tolerance, and both
fans can be controlled using SpeedFan which is a huge bonus. On the other hand,
the CPU fan's minimum speed is too high, and if you use BIOS control, the auxiliary
fan does not react to changes in temperature.

Both of these boards offer a slew of features including HDMI, DVI, S/PDIF,
eSATA and FireWire, RAID 0/1/10, a 100% solid-state capacitor design, and a
very capable onboard graphics chip. The M4A785TD-V and 785GM-E65 retail for
about $30 less than their 790GX counterparts. The new chipset won't blow anyone's
socks off, but it does give price-conscious users a reason to choose the newer
AM3/DDR3 platform rather than settling on an AM2+/DDR2 solution simply because
of the price. It is also a compelling alternative to an Intel based platform.
The only Intel motherboard we can find that matches the features of these two
boards is the Gigabyte GA-EG45M-UD2H which retails for $130. The bottom line on Intel vs. AMD for affordable HTPC: The MSI 785GM-E65
is $40 cheaper and has faster onboard graphics.

Asus M4A785TD-V EVO
PROS



* Feature-rich

* Liberal BIOS options

* Excellent HD video playback

* Fairly good 3D performance

* Well cooled
CONS



* High idle and low load power consumption

* Doesn't undervolt well
MSI 785GM-E65
PROS



* Feature-rich

* Liberal BIOS options

* Excellent HD video playback

* Fairly good 3D performance

* Well cooled

* Excellent idle and low load power consumption
* Undervolts well
CONS



* Poor fan control

Our thanks to Asus
and Micro-Star International
for the motherboard samples.

* * *

Articles of Related Interest

Intel DG41MJ: Affordable 775 Mini-ITX

DFI LanParty JR 790GX-M3H5 mATX
Motherboard


Zotac IONITX-A: An ION / dual-core Atom
Mini-ITX Board


Asus M4A78-HTPC/RC: A Complete HTPC
Solution?


Zotac GeForce 9300-ITX WiFi: Good
Things Come in Small Packages


Asus M4A78T-E AM3 motherboard

* * *

Discuss this article in the
SPCR forums.

Google

www SPCR