Optical Drive noise

The forum for non-component-related silent pc discussions.

Moderators: NeilBlanchard, Ralf Hutter, sthayashi, Lawrence Lee

Post Reply
mark314
Friend of SPCR
Posts: 82
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 8:02 am

Optical Drive noise

Post by mark314 » Fri Jul 16, 2010 7:47 am

--note - moving this from Quiet, prebuild, and SFF as it seems a more appropriate forum. I'll close off the other thread. :) --

Hi,

There's no optical drive forum that I could see so here goes:

I want to use dampening panels to reduce as much as possible the noise from a slim optical drive. We're talking 2x blu-ray which I understand runs at about 10,000 rpm.

Does anyone have any experience with vibration and/or frequency spectrum of the generated noise? I am planning on putting panels that are, say, 1/4 inch, on the top and bottom of the drive before soft-mounting it to the frame.

If I know more details of the noise generated, I can more accurately pick a panel. I'm thinking in particular of vibration dampening pads such as http://polytechinc.com/products/damping.php

I might also combine it with a software to slow the drive, such as http://cdslow.webhost.ru/en/cdslow/

As all I need to do is read blu-rays, (not burn) I should be able to slow it down accordingly. Shouldn't 1x speed be enough?

Oh, and don't say it doesn't matter - this is the only part of the htpc that has moving parts, and the only part that makes any noise whatsoever.

Thoughts?

Mark

MikeC
Site Admin
Posts: 12283
Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2002 3:26 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Contact:

Post by MikeC » Fri Jul 16, 2010 9:22 am

The only thing you can do about the acoustic noise is to slow the drive down... the rest is vibration induced noise. The freq spectrum is more or less broadband with tonal peaks in mid and high frequencies -- they vary depending on usage and specific drive as well as the disc itself.

The only really effective OD silencing method I've found in many years of trying is to basically cut an opening in an appropriately soft and damped block of foam to fit the optical drive into (or thick enough sheets to surround 4 sides of the drive. The OD then sits nestled in the foam block.

Longevity of the foam might be a question (they do kind of fall apart over time) and perhaps heat buildup. Obviously this may require a fair bit of case modding. I used it in a custom medite board self-made box; worked well.
Mike Chin, SPCR Editor/Publisher
Support SPCR by buying your gear through this link: Amazon

mark314
Friend of SPCR
Posts: 82
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 8:02 am

Post by mark314 » Fri Jul 16, 2010 10:00 am

Hmm. Thanks. Slowing the drive down seems like a good option then.

Have you tried vibration-damping adhesive pads like the one I've linked?

I'm thinking Polydamp Extensional Damping Pad (EDP)
EDP is a lightweight, self-adhesive composite with a viscoelastic surface and aggressive pressure sensitive adhesive backing designed to reduce resonant vibration and resulting airborne sound. Provides effective damping over a broad temperature and frequency range. Extremely durable, water resistant and odorless. EDP reduces noisy vibration in thin metal or plastic panels.

MikeC
Site Admin
Posts: 12283
Joined: Sun Aug 11, 2002 3:26 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Contact:

Post by MikeC » Fri Jul 16, 2010 10:11 am

mark314 wrote:Hmm. Thanks. Slowing the drive down seems like a good option then.

Have you tried vibration-damping adhesive pads like the one I've linked?

I'm thinking Polydamp Extensional Damping Pad (EDP)
EDP is a lightweight, self-adhesive composite with a viscoelastic surface and aggressive pressure sensitive adhesive backing designed to reduce resonant vibration and resulting airborne sound. Provides effective damping over a broad temperature and frequency range. Extremely durable, water resistant and odorless. EDP reduces noisy vibration in thin metal or plastic panels.
No, I haven't... but I have samples of stuff that might be similar. It's very much a trial and error thing -- hard to know what the results will be before you try because it's human reaction we're dealing with, not just a physical phenomenon. Also, if you still bolt down the drive to the chassis, this stuff is unlikely to do any good -- the mechanical coupling is what allows the vibrations to make noise.

iirc, there's one or two ODs that claim to suspend- or soft-mount the internal mechanism from the casing to reduce noise. Never tested one, afaik... but it would have to be very well done to work. All it takes is one strong mechanical coupling...
Mike Chin, SPCR Editor/Publisher
Support SPCR by buying your gear through this link: Amazon

themaster1
Posts: 95
Joined: Fri Apr 23, 2010 9:01 pm
Location: Southern France

Post by themaster1 » Fri Jul 16, 2010 5:20 pm

Yep slowing the drive speed down via a software is the solution. If you have XP use Nero Drive Speed. For Vista/ 7 i don't know.

Post Reply